Mutual Organ Donation Society

Alexander Chislenko sasha at eris.cs.umb.edu
Fri May 6 22:33:45 EST 1994


  I am reposting my earlier article here, as it seems relevant to
the current blood donation discussions on bionet.general..


		MUTUAL ORGAN DONATION SOCIETY

   I've been reading and thinking a lot recently about the problem with
the lack of donor organs for transplantation.
Every day, several people die only because donor organs are not available
(I haven't read any statistics on how many people live less because they
got the organs too late or gave up on waiting and chose alternative
treatment) - while lots of healthy organs needed to save these people's
lives get wasted - buried or cremated.
			

   Actually, the only thing that is needed to fix the situation, is an
organizational mechanism that would make sure that the existing supply
of organs reaches the potential recipients.
   Market may be a good idea, though after watching "Crossfire" on CNN
recently, with Andrew Kimbrell "explaining" the audience that "human body
is not a commodity" (he sure knows better how *I* should treat *my* body),
I am less convinced than ever that market can be a *socially acceptable*
solution in the foreseeable future.
(Opinions about alternative economic approaches to identity architectures
 and @#$%&! retrograds available upon request).
________________________________________________________________________
|   How about the following idea: allow people to sign donor cards that |
|would give their organs for free to anybody who signed a similar card, |
|with the priority given to those who signed up earlier. (Plus, maybe,  |
|some special cases for unconditional donors, children, Nobelists...)   |
|_______________________________________________________________________|

  It would give an immediate incentive to all people to sign up as soon as
possible, and thus will satisfy egotistic interests; it is also attractive
enough for pure altruists.
Organs not needed for MODS members may be stored or donated/sold to the rest
of the population.

   I don't see how any of the existing arguments against the organ market
may apply to the free, voluntary and accessible to everybody Mutual Organ
Donation Society (MODS).

   Your health condition will not matter; you can still sign up.
However, your religion may not allow you to sign up (? - well, then,
don't...) or donate organs at all (then it probably shouldn't allow
you to accept donated organs either... I doubt though that this can
be a serious obstacle). [Cryonicists are the only special case here...]

  With MODS growing rapidly from the start, soon *everybody* will be
guaranteed free donor organs whenever they need them.
(MODS membership would still make sense, because it may help you get
an organ a bit faster and will give additional assurances, which may
be important for urgent and rare cases)

   Do you think something like this may be implemented?


Alexander Chislenko - sasha at cs.umb.edu



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