DC area seminar: Promise & Perils of Genetic Information

Telecom Sys. Policy instctsp at seas.gwu.edu
Thu Dec 21 00:47:51 EST 1995


                "Third Fridays" Seminar - January 19, 1996
        "Technology and Heath Care: Visions for the 21st Century"

        Institute for Computer & Telecommunications Systems Policy
               Ronald Reagan Institute of Emergency Medicine
              Institute for Medical Imaging and Image Analysis

  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          Supported in part by 
  The George Washington University in celebration of the 175th Anniversary.  
      Other support provided by Picker International and Elscint, Inc.

                       FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
                  Refreshments served after the lecture.


                        Friday, January 19, 1996
                                3-5 p.m.

                       Room 410-415 Marvin Center
                     21st & H St. NW, Washington, DC

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               THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF GENETIC INFORMATION

               Speaker:  Philip R. Reilly, M.D., J.D.
                         Executive Director
         Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Inc., Waltham, Mass.

               Discussant:  Benjamin W. Moulton, J.D.
      General Counsel to The George Washington University Medical Center
         Deputy General Counsel to The George Washington University
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                 
                                    Summary

 The Human Genome Project, approaching the midpoint of its fifteen year
 quest to sequence 100,000 genes, two sets of which are needed for human
 development, will soon have a major impact on medicine.  Prenatal testing,
 carrier testing, newborn screening, predictive testing, disease monitoring
 and therapeutic choices based on genetic profiles are or soon will be
 routine.  Gene therapy is in its infancy, but early work suggests that DNA
 based drugs will be a reality. 

 The acquisition and analysis of vast quantities of genetic information are
 forcing us to re-examine long and closely held assumptions about the right
 to privacy.  Who should have access to genetic information?  For what
 purposes may it be used?  How will genetic information affect our notion
 of human equality?  What must we do to realize the promise and avert the
 perils?  

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   Please visit ICTSP on the Web to learn more about the Seminar series:

        URL:  http://www.seas.gwu.edu/seas/ictsp/Activities/Seminars/





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