The immortal are living among us NOW!

Paul H. Kronfield geoprobe at neosoft.com
Thu Nov 9 22:50:18 EST 1995


In article <47tiu4$j72 at ixnews7.ix.netcom.com> slk at ix.netcom.com (Steven Keys) writes:
>From: slk at ix.netcom.com (Steven Keys)
>Subject: Re: The immortal are living among us NOW!
>Date: 9 Nov 1995 18:57:08 GMT

>In <47rs92$4pr at informer1.cis.McMaster.CA> Ann Tekatch
><a7503934 at mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca> writes: 
>>
>>FROM: Bill Tekatch <a7503934 at mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca>
>>
>>"Paul Boduch (ES 1997)" <pboduch at minerva.cis.yale.edu> wrote:
>>>
>>>  You've got me stumped here. Is it some kind of tree, the giant
>redwoods 
>>> pehaps?
>>
>>For being "stumped" you did well.
>>
>>It is the Brislecone Pine.  The oldest one found was
>>felled in 1964 in Nevada's Humboldt National Forest.
>>
>>The Sierra redwood has an estimated maximum age
>>of 4,000 years and ages to 2,200 to 2,300 verified.
>>
>>My point is perhaps trying to optimize the performance
>>of the human body for life span by fine tuning its
>>operation can only yield at best perhaps a 30%
>>increase in life span.  The giant advances will
>>come from radical steps such as the application
>>of knowledge about other organisms that are
>>already immortal.
>>
>>Sincerely,
>>Bill Tekatch
>>

>Brislecone Pine don't have any living cells that are older than around
>30 years, they just form successive layers on top of one another that
>are continually dying out.  

>Steven Keys

hrumphhh, as I said - the apical maristem!


Paul Kronfield
Houston, Texas, USA
geoprobe at neosoft.com
homepage: http://www.neosoft.com/~geoprobe/



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