Is medical care a Right?

Mark A. Friesel mfriesel at beta.tricity.wsu.edu
Mon Jun 17 14:47:08 EST 1996



On Sat, 15 Jun 1996, Marcio V. Pinheiro wrote:

> On 14 Jun 1996 18:24:14 GMT, starbuck at phong.ucr.edu (a. j. greenwood)
> wrote:
>
> >In article <4p8cr1$1a45 at itssrv1.ucsf.edu>,
> >Bert Gold <bgold at itsa.ucsf.edu> wrote:
> >>Dear  A. J. Greenwood,
> >>You cannot have a gun without someone to make or purchase it from.
> >>You cannot have a printing press without having someone else
> >>Human beings are social animals.
> >>You are confused if you think otherwise.
> >>San Francisco
> >
> >
> >I do find myself somewhat confused at not being able to see
> >the point of view you express in your last statement.
> >Are you saying that when someone does not agree with you
> >that they are confused?
> >
> >In my post on the topic "Is medical care a Right?" I took the view
> >that the word entitlement is a more accurate term to describe
> >any health care system that is both mandatory and universal.
> >
> >That statement was made in  reference to some who have called health
> >care a right.  I disagree with that view.  From my point of view a
> >'right`, one does not need cooperation or permission etc to exercise
> >a right.   Nor do I have to compel others to provide their resources
> >for my benefit.
> >

The answer is simple and removes the ambiguity from the religious message.
Being able to provide health care to those who need it is a priviledge,
and those capable of doing so should be grateful that they were given such
an opportunity.  By adopting this view, the discussion of whether it is a
'right' to receive it becomes meaningless.




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