Chicken or the Egg

tripleu at telis.org tripleu at telis.org
Thu Jul 31 21:40:24 EST 1997


The Myths of Modern Science - THE CHICKEN AND THE EGG

Myth: Many diseases occur because of genetic malfunctions which are
inherant in the evolutionary gene pool and are, thus, unavoidable.

There is no proof that genes are inherantly bad. Some of them are indeed
bad. But there is no proof as to WHY they are bad. And, further, there is
no proof that they are naturally and inherantly bad, without outside
intervention. This is an evolutionary assumption for which there is NO
scientific proof.

Scientifically, we know that genetic malfunctions occur. But we do not
know why they occur. We do not know, for example, whether the
malfunctions occur and then cause disease, or whether the disease-causing
agent is present in the womb and then causes genetic malfunctions.

Was it the chicken that came first or the egg?

There is the distinct possibility that a disease-causing microorganism,
like a bacteria or yeast fungus, is present in the womb and subsequently
causes genetic malfuntions. The malfunctions themselves are then
secondary causes of disease. The primary cause is the pathogenic actions
of microorganisms during critical times of fetal development in the womb
and during early childhood.

With this very real possibility comes the responsibility for a change in
scientific direction. In science, what we're working on now is how to fix
genes once they get messed up. What we need to be working on is how to
keep them from getting messed up in the first place.

Preventative antimicrobial measures, then, become the best method for
treating genetic diseases. Antimicrobial measures would be cheaper,
easier, and technically more feasible than DNA surgeries, additions, and
laboratory manipulations. Therefore, these preventative measures could
also be useful in the ghettos, rural areas, and in the Third World.

Testing women early in pregnancy for microbe infection of the bloodstream
and womb fluids would allow early detection and appropriate treatment with
antibiotics and fungicides. Such measures would be most effective early in
pregnancy, before crucial fetal development has taken place.

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