Doctor, Test the Meds

tripleu at telis.org tripleu at telis.org
Thu Jul 31 21:40:02 EST 1997


Some scientists would say that we've learned everything we can about
antibiotics. But there's still one very important thing that we don't
know. . Do antibiotics work better when the microorganisms are active or
inactive?

Would penicillin, for example, be more effective if given to a patient at
a time when the offending microorganism was active in the bloodstream?

If so, then a small change in our antibiotic formulas would be
recommended. Our antibiotics, in that case, would need to be prepared
with appropiate amounts of sugars and carbohydrates. These additional
substances are food for the microorganisms.  They would cause the
microorganism to be active. And at the same time, the antibiotics would
be entering the bloodstream. This would then cause the antibiotics to be
more effective.

The exact sugars and carbohydrates needed would vary with each type of
medicine and each type of disease, depending on the abilities of the
attacking microorganism. Anti-fungal medicines, for example, would
probably need to include dextrose and/or glucose. Antibiotics would
contain potato starch and/or various sugars. And anti-viral medicines
would need to include proteins, rather than starches or sugars.

If we find instead that penicillin is less effective if given to a
patient at a time when the offending microorganism is active, then an
alteration in patient behavior would be recommended. (rather than a
change in the chemical make up of the medicine)  A doctor's advice would
change while the medicine remained the same.  If penicillin is less
effective when the offending micro-organism is active, the patient should
be advised to refrain from drinking and eating foods that would cause the
microorganism to be active during the anti-microbial regimen.

For example, a person with a viral infection would be advised to refrain
from eating large amounts of protein, even vegetarian protein. A person
with a yeast infection would be advised to refrain from eating large
amounts of sugars, including the sugars found in corn. (dextrose)  And a
person with a bacterial infection would be advised to refrain from eating
large amounts of both starches and sugars.

This seems like a very simple question.  But it's never been addressed.
So, let me ask again:  do antibiotics work better when the microorganisms
are active or inactive? And what are we doing about it?

KEAnderson
www.geocities.com/~keanderson
tripleu at telis.org

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