Indologist confirms maize in ancient sculptures

Hu McCulloch mcculloch.2 at osu.edu
Sat Nov 14 11:24:18 EST 1998


arron <kcchin at pacific.net.sg> writes, concerning Monstera deliciosa
(aka split leaf philodendron, or Mexican breadfruit), one of the several
New World plants, including maize, sunflower, sweetsop (sometimes called
custard apple), pineapple, and cashew reported by Indologist 
Shakti M Gupta in her 1996 _Plants in Indian Temple Art_ as
appearing in Hindu and Jain temple sculptures of the 13th
century AD and earlier,

>Graham Harden wrote:
>> of the fruit of the Monstera deliciosa..... aka fruit-salad-fruit.  ......

>....................fruit of Monstera  edible?????    (fruit and
>salad).....always assume it to be poisonous  and have been advising kids not to
>even play near them...................................
>(thought  plants with latex are have great chance of being poisonous.).

Apparently the leaves are poisonous and a hazard to children and pets.
However, Gupta reports that its fruit is considered to be a delicacy,
and has a mixed flavor of pineapple and banana.
Her Figure 136 (p. 109) shows both the leaf, draped over 
the shoulders of Vishnu, and the fruit, held on a dish by a smaller
figure to Vishnu's right. 

-- Hu McCulloch
   http://economics.sbs.ohio-state.edu/jhm/arch/outliers.html





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