eye color

killianros at my-deja.com killianros at my-deja.com
Thu Oct 14 16:40:41 EST 1999


Recently on MNBC on cable there was a story of man, whom has blue eyes
and wife whom has blue eyes, had a child with brown eyes. The 2 couples
divorced (wife up and left w/ child while husband was out of town)She
sued him for child support. The man remarried 2 years later. One day
the mother of the child showed up at ex-husband door to drop off kid
for weekend visitational rights. The new wife notice something that
shocked her. The child with brown eyes from blue eyed dominant parents.
Medelain laws states...no issues bearing brown eyes from parents with
dominate blue traits can have brown eyes. No exceptions !
The new wife had Medelian's Laws of Inheritance from her college days
and read up on this. She insisted that her husband take a DNA test with
his son. The test results: 99.99 % not his child. He back sued the ex-
wife. He won. It is genetically impossible for 2 dominate blue-eyed
parents to have brown eyed children. But, 2 brown eyed parents can have
a blue-eyed child. The author of this study from below has a twin. He
probably needs to have a DNA tests to show proof that his parents are
biologically his. I doubt it though. SURPRISE !! :)

Killian de Ros

p.s. check sources!! Confirm,confirm,confirm!!










In article <06949404.41fa6a3c at usw-ex0107-051.remarq.com>,
  Nick Theodorakis <nicholas_theodorakis at urmc.rochester.edu> wrote:
>
> In article <2596fd39.251b1006 at aol.com>, GPJHSH at AOL.COM
> wrote:
> >  heres the question: i am a girl, my father has blue
> > eyes , my mother  has
> > blue eyes and i have brown eyes. is this possible?
>
> A search of the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)
> at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/
> with the phrase "eye color" turns up this:
>
> (*227240 EYE COLOR 1; EYCL1)
>
> Eye color is likely to be a polygenic trait. The early view
> that blue is a simple recessive has been repeatedly shown to
> be wrong by observation of brown-eyed offspring of 2 blue-
> eyed parents. My monozygotic twin brother and I, brown-eyed,
> had blue-eyed parents and blue-eyed sibs. Blue-eyed
> offspring from 2 brown-eyed parents is a more frequent
> finding. In some Norwegian families, Gedde-Dahl (1981) found
> diffusely brown eyes or centrally brown eyes segregating as
> simple dominant traits, symbolized BEY1. Possible linkage to
> Km (Inv) and to Co was found, suggesting the order Jk--Km--
> BEY1--Co. (Co and Km are not measurably linked.) In a
> linkage study, Eiberg et al. (1986) scored eye color in a
> questionnaire as purely blue, green, gray, brown, or 'don't
> know.' The presence of brown areas or spots were also noted.
> For the purpose of linkage analysis, they assumed 2 main
> loci: (1) a 'green/blue' locus (GEY) with a dominant allele
> for green and a recessive allele for blue, and (2) a 'brown/
> blue' locus (BEY) with a dominant allele for brown and a
> recessive for blue. Linkage of GEY with Lutheran and
> secretor (located on chromosome 19 at q13.1) was
> found. They reported a lod score of 3.37 (theta = 0.0 for
> males and 0.07 for females) against Lutheran and of 1.79 (at
> theta = 0.1 in males) against secretor, from observations
> largely in different families. In the full report, Eiberg
> and Mohr (1987) reported a combined lod score of 9.19 for
> linkage between GEY and the Lutheran-secretor systems. They
> also found evidence for linkage of GEY to brown hair color
> (113750) with a lod score of 5.06.
>
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