Confusion

Nancy Kirkpatrick nkirkpatrick at gw.lssu.edu
Thu Feb 24 17:16:57 EST 2000


Salisbury & Ross in their Plant Physiology textbook state that GA causes parthenocarpic fruit development in some  species, but they don't say which ones.  GA is sprayed on Thompson seedless grapes to increase fruit size and to elongate the bunches in order to retard fungal growth.  But I don't know if GA or auxin is used to produce the seedless condition.

As for roots, some GA synthesis occurs in roots, but externally applied GA has no effect on root growth and seems to inhibit adventitious root formation.

I can't verify this, but I seem to remember that GA promotes stem growth at very low concentrations and inhibits growth at higher concentrations.

Nancy S. Kirkpatrick, PhD.
Assistant Professor 
Biology Department
Lake Superior State University
Sault Ste. Marie, Mi  49783
(906) 635-2894 FAX: (906) 635-2266
nkirkpatrick at gw.lssu.edu


>>> "lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk" <lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk.nospam> 02/23 8:52 AM >>>
After referring to different textbooks and other sources, I found that some
of them says GA inhibit root growth, but the other says it promotes it.  Do
both IAA and GA causes parthecarpy?


--
lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk 





>>> "lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk" <lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk.nospam> 02/23 8:52 AM >>>
After referring to different textbooks and other sources, I found that some
of them says GA inhibit root growth, but the other says it promotes it.  Do
both IAA and GA causes parthecarpy?


--
lawrence at lmli.freeserve.co.uk 




---




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