Symposium on speciation

Stewart Berlocher qms1.life.uiuc.edu at vixen.cso.uiuc.edu
Tue Sep 5 16:30:45 EST 1995


*** SYMPOSIUM ANNOUNCEMENT ***** SYMPOSIUM ANNOUNCEMENT ***

     >>> PLEASE FORWARD TO OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES <<<



          ENDLESS FORMS:  SPECIES AND SPECIATION



            Symposium in Honor of Guy L. Bush

     Organizers:  Daniel Howard and Stewart Berlocher


On May 19-May 23, 1996, a symposium will be held at 
Asilomar, California to summarize our current understanding 
of speciation and to plot directions for future research.  
Since the last symposium on speciation in 1987, which 
resulted in the highly regarded "Speciation and its 
Consequences" (D. Otte and J. Endler, eds.), significant 
progress has been made in a number of areas, including 
genetic change at speciation, the molecular genetics of 
reproductive isolation, models of speciation, and 
speciation in the fossil record.  Controversy over species 
concepts, ever simmering, is close to the boiling point at 
present.

The symposium will honor Guy Bush on the occasion of the 
30th anniversary of his 1966 Museum of Comparative Zoology 
monograph on *Rhagoletis*; this watershed work established 
these fruit flies as a touchstone of debate about the 
possibility of sympatric speciation via ecological shifts.  
Bush has long been associated with challenging accepted 
ideas on speciation, and wrote a key review paper in 1975 
that set the stage for modern speciation research.

Although the symposium will honor Bush, its major purpose 
is to bring some of the world's leading researchers on 
speciation together in a gathering structured to encourage 
the free exchange of ideas and data.  Expanded versions of 
talks by the 30 participants will be published in a 
symposium volume of the same title as the symposium.


MAJOR AREAS TO BE COVERED:

* Species Concepts
* Geography, Ecology, and Population Structure
* The Nature of Mate Recognition and Reproductive Isolation
* The Genetics of Reproductive Isolation
* Interactions Between Species and the Nature of Species
     Boundaries
* The Ecology of Speciation and the Evolution of Novelty


SPEAKERS

Michael Arnold      Mark MacNair          James Patton
Stewart Berlocher   Jim Mallet            Michael Ritchie
Guy Bush            Therese Markow        Bill Rice  
Roger Butlin        Marta Martinez Wells  Louise Roth
Jeff Feder          Amy McCune            Dolph Schluter
Rosemary Grant      Steph Menken          Kerry Shaw
Richard Harrison    John Mercer           Franco Spirito
Daniel Howard       Horacio Naviera       Alan Templeton
Paul Johnson        Stephen Palumbi       David Wake
Haris Lessios       Dorothy Pashley       Jack Werren


TALKS:

*SPECIES CONCEPTS*

KERRY SHAW
The diversity of process and the evolution of natural 
groups

ALAN TEMPLETON
Geography, population structure, ecology, and gene trees.


*GEOGRAPHY, ECOLOGY, AND POPULATION STRUCTURE*

STEWART H. BERLOCHER
The biogeographic/phylogenetic evidence for sympatric 
speciation.

PAUL JOHNSON
Multi-locus models of sympatric speciation.

JEFFREY L. FEDER
Host race formation and sympatric speciation in the apple 
maggot fly:  Fact or fiction?

WILLIAM R. RICE
The evolution of reproductive isolation without allopatry: 
the role of sexually antagonistic coevolution.

STEPHANUS B. J. MENKEN
Evolution of insect-plant associations:  *Yponomeuta* as a 
case study.

AMY MCCUNE
The mire of speciating fishes in ancient lakes:  Could 
speciation be sympatric?

DOLPH SCHLUTER
Ecological causes of speciation.

M. R. MCNAIR
The evolution of edaphic endemics.

HARIS A. LESSIOS
The first stages of speciation as seen in organisms 
separated by the Isthmus of Panama.

DAVID B. WAKE
Genetic interactions in a ring species:  Rings within 
rings, and weak links.

JAMES L. PATTON
Ridges, rivers, and refuges:  The timing and 
diversification of Amazonian Mammals.


*THE NATURE OF MATE RECOGNITION AND REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION*

THERESA ANN MARKOW
Reproductive isolation in *Drosophila* : A case study from 
the Sonoran desert.

MARTA L. MARTINEZ WELLS
The role of mating signals in reproductive isolation among 
cryptic species of insects.

STEPHEN R. PALUMBI
Speciation and gamete recognition:  Patterns of 
polymorphism of the gamete recognition protein bindin in 
sea urchins.

DANIEL J. HOWARD
The evolution of barriers to fertilization in terrestrial 
organisms.

JOHN H. WERREN
Symbiotic bacteria and speciation.


*GENETICS OF REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION AND MATE RECOGNITION*

HORACIO NAVIERA
The genetics of hybrid male sterility in *Drosophila*.

MICHAEL G. RITCHIE
The evolutionary genetics of sexual signaling:  Is there an 
equivalent of Haldane's Rule for premating isolation?

DOROTHY PROWELL PASHLEY
Linkage, sex, and speciation in Lepidoptera.

FRANCO SPIRITO
The role of chromosomal change in speciation.

JAMES MALLET
Mimicry and warning color at the boundary between 
microevolution and macroevolution.


*INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SPECIES AND THE NATURE OF SPECIES 
BOUNDARIES*

RICHARD G. HARRISON
Molecular genetic markers and the study of speciation.

MICHAEL L. ARNOLD
Assortative mating and selection in a hybrid population of 
*Iris*.

ROGER BUTLIN
What do hybrid zones in general, and the *Chorthippus 
parallelus* zone in particular, tell us about speciation?

B. ROSEMARY GRANT
Hybridization and speciation in Darwin's Finches.


*THE EVOLUTION OF NOVELTY*

V. LOUISE ROTH and JOHN M. MERCER
Bushy radiations and diversification in the Sciuridae.


*CONCLUSION*

GUY L. BUSH
Historical perspective and conclusions.


MEETING FORMAT AND SCHEDULE:
In the style of Gordon Conferences, there will be no 
concurrent sessions, and much free time for discussion.  
Arrivals will be Sunday May 19 and departures will be 
Thursday May 23.  During the three full days of the meeting 
(Monday May 20 through Wednesday May 22) talks are 
scheduled for morning and early afternoon, leaving late 
afternoons and evenings free.  Each day immediately 
following the last afternoon session there will be a one 
hour discussion of the day's talks, with the speakers 
present. A banquet will conclude the meeting.


POSTER SESSION
In order to allow as many attendees as possible to 
participate and contribute ideas, space for 60 posters will 
be available in a room adjacent to the lecture room.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Background information will be available soon on the World 
Wide Web at http://www.life.uiuc.edu/berlocher/symposium/


REGISTRATION INFORMATION:
Registration for the meeting will be handled by the 
organizers, while room and board at Asilomar will be 
handled directly by Asilomar.  To obtain all registration 
information, please contact Daniel Howard at New Mexico 
State via email or conventional mail.  We will return the 
meeting and Asilomar forms to you.

    ORGANIZERS
    Daniel Howard
       Department of Biology
       New Mexico State University
       Las Cruces, NM  88003
       dahoward at nmsu.edu

    Stewart Berlocher
       Department of Entomology/320 Morril Hall
       University of Illinois
       505 S. Goodwin
       Urbana, IL  61801
       stewart_berlocher at qms1.life.uiuc.edu

    IMPORTANT NOTE
    *THE MEETING WILL LIMITED TO THE FIRST 200 REGISTRANTS*

    REGISTRATION DEADLINE:
    All registration must be completed by January 1, 1996
    in order to make preparations with Asilomar.


ACCOMMODATIONS AT ASILOMAR AND ELSEWHERE:
Lodging at Asilomar is comparable in price with local 
accommodations (see below), is attractively located on the 
coastline, and is, of course, very convenient to the 
meeting and attendant discussion.  However, participants 
need not stay at Asilomar to attend, and those traveling 
with spouses/families may want to investigate staying in 
nearby Monterey.


MEETING COSTS:

    MEETING REGISTRATION -
    The cost of meeting registration is commensurate with
    that of meetings such as the Society for the Study of
    Evolution.  Registration is $140, and $110 for
    students.  (Finances will be handled by New Mexico
    State at Las Cruces.  Funds will be used exclusively
    for expenses associated with the meeting, such as
    travel expenses for speakers and rental of audio-visual
    equipment.  If money remains after meeting expenses
    have been covered, it will be refunded to
    participants).

    ACCOMMODATION AT ASILOMAR - 
    Current prices for a 4 day meeting range between $477
    and $249 per person, depending on accommodations and
    occupants/room.  PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS INCLUDES BOTH
    ROOM AND BOARD (food at Asilomar is reputedly quite
    good), FOR THE ENTIRE DURATION OF THE MEETING.
    Asilomar has set aside accommodations for 238 persons,
    so some spouses/ families can be accommodated at
    Asilomar.  As with meeting registration, accommodations
    at Asilomar are on a "first come-first served" basis.
   

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    Digital *Rhagoletis pomonella*, the apple maggot fly




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