Cell synchronization

Brian Foley brianf at med.uvm.edu
Sat Feb 19 07:23:45 EST 1994


ZENAITIS,MICHAEL,MR (B7TH000 at MUSICB.MCGILL.CA) wrote:
: How is cell synchrony defined for filamentous organisms?  For
: unicellular organisms, it's easy: all your cells grow together and
: then divide at the same time.  For filamentous organisms, though,
: you have septation of the hypha for the growing tips but you also
: have the growth of new branches from others.
: Any help will be much appreciated.

	Cell synchrony for any organism means that all the cells are
dividing at the same time.  In a filamentous organism you would see the
tips and new buds emerging at the same time if they were synchronous.
It may be harder to synchronize a filamentous organism than tissue
culture cells, but that does not change the definition.
	Tissue culture cels can be syncronized by adding cell cycle
blocking agents that arrest the cells all at the same point in the 
cell cycle.  WHen the agent is removed, the cells all start to divide
at the same rate.  If they have very uniform cell cycles a culture
might remain in synchrony for 8 or more divisions, but in some cell
lines, synchrony can only be maintained for 2 or 3 cell divisions.

: Mike Zenaitis
: Chemical Engineering, McGill U.


--
********************************************************************
*  Brian Foley               *     If we knew what we were doing   *
*  Molecular Genetics Dept.  *     it wouldn't be called research  *
*  University of Vermont     *                                     *
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