Suppose you are a cell??

Russell Buonor/Anatomy BUONOR at JEFLIN.TJU.EDU
Wed Mar 29 09:11:26 EST 1995



On Wed, 29 Mar 1995, Giovanni Maga wrote:

> In article <Pine.3.89.1.2-VMS-7.9503230936.A578594-0100000 at JEFLIN.TJU.EDU>,
> BUONOR at JEFLIN.TJU.EDU (Russell Buonor/Anatomy) wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> > > >MDbones1 at ix.netcom.com (Dee Bones) wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >> Suppose that you are a cell with a complete & fully functional set of
> > >
> > > >> organelles...
> > > >> Now, for whatever reason you must sacrifice one of those organelles
> > > yet
> > > >> remain alive.
> > > >> Which cellular organelle would you give up and why?  What are the
> > > >> consequences???
> > > >>
> > > >> Thanks in advance to all...............DeeBones
> > > >
> 
> > Let those mitochondria go, ferment and survive at a slower more relaxed pace!
> >
> > Russ Buono  consumer of wine and beer!!
> 
> 
> This idea of mitochondria to go has been forwarded by many answers to this
> question. I am not sure it can be a general argument that they can leave
> without problems for the cell. For sure, the cell usually do not have to
> choose (and if I were a cell I wouldn't choose as well). Loss of some
> organelles is just the result of evolution, i.e. selection for some
> variants (which arise spontaneously and randomly) which have more fitness
> for a particular enviroment. Change env. and you will change the kind of
> mutation selected. Thus, for some cell is good not to have mitochondria
> (BTW, in yeast you *do not* loose the chromosomal genes for mitochondrial
> proteins) for other ones not. Someone else cited flagellated protozoa (such
> as Trichonympha, Barbulanympha, Pyrsonympha) that live in the hindgut of
> lower termites and the wood-feeding roach, Cryptocercus. It is clear that
> this is a special case of adaptation to a particular enviroment (but if I
> were a cell and still keeping my common sense I would not like to live
> inside a termite) but it cannot be general.
> maga at vetbio.unizh.ch
> 
> 
Hey how about the human lens fiber cells.  After differentiation they 
lose all their organells, nucleus, mitos, all of them.  Then they stay 
stable and transparent for 60, 70 , or even 80 years. 
Russ Buono, still consuming beer and wine!



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