Ion-free water for human consumption?

David Konerding dek at socrates.ucsf.edu
Sun Oct 13 00:46:15 EST 1996


In article <32603228.1811 at umslvma.umsl.edu>, Milvern K Miller wrote:
>
>It is somewhat interesting that my statement about drinking deionized
>water has generated such a response.  With regard to D20, I think I
>rember reading once in Encyclopedia Brittanica (my old 1971 edition)
>that D20 will have the interesting effect of slowing reactions down
>within a cell when there is a large amount of D20 present (on the order
>of 5% or more).  I heard that the reason this is so is that although
>Deuturium is electronically identical to Hydrogen, its extra weight will
>cause reactants to move more slowly as each reaction occurs, either
>because of hindrance of other molecules, or because of its being
>incorporated into the organic molecules of the cell and slowing those
>molecules down by increased weight.  I may be mistaken but I think that
>is what I heard.


It is called the 'kinetic isotope effect' and I think the effect is due
to the larger mass of D compared to H, as you mention.  It's a measurable
effect and occasionally is a concern, but rarely do you see so much D2O in
your H2O that it's worth worrying about.

I noticed this is xposted to alt.beer.  Anybody brewing beer using DI water?


-- 
-- David Konerding --
Graduate Group in Biophysics, Box 0446
University of California
San Francisco, CA 94143
email: dek at cgl.ucsf.edu         WWW:http://picasso.ucsf.edu/~dek




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