Ion-free water for human consumption?

Chris Boyd chrisb at hgu.mrc.ac.uk
Mon Oct 14 10:41:42 EST 1996


Milverneus Millerion (miller at diamond.jcn1.com) wrote:
: krasel at wpxx02.toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de (Cornelius Krasel) writes: > z (un691cs at genius.embnet.dkfz-heidelberg.de) wrote:
: > > So my question is: is it healthy or not to drink distilled or VE water.
: > > are there any studies that describe damage to the organism ?
: > 
: > AFAIK it's an urban legend. BTW, VE water is usually prepared by two
: > consecutive ion exchanger steps.
: > 
: > Thread renamed. Followups narrowed.
: > 
(snip)
: DeIonized water contains no Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, or any other ions
: good, or bad, in it.  When you drink the water it is devoid of salt.
: Electrolyte balance, however, is maintained by the kidneys.  I have 
: consumed DI water from some faucets in some chemistry labs and prefer 
                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
: its taste (or lack of it) to other waters.  I am not sure if it would be 
: better for someone on a low sodium diet than hard water.
(snip)

(followups pruned even more)

Anyone who consumes lab chemicals or solutions is just plain stupid.
While you might think it's a worthwhile saving to sweeten your tea with
BDH sucrose off the lab shelf, consider the consequences if the last
person to dip a spatula in had failed to remove traces of potassium
cyanide from it.  Or imagine drinking punch made with liquid from the
lab ethanol Winchester someone had accidentally refilled with methanol.
(It has happened.)

And don't imagine that your DI water tap hasn't seen active service
in or near some quite noxious solutions...

Best wishes,
--
Chris Boyd                       | from, | MRC Human Genetics Unit
chrisb at hgu.mrc.ac.uk             |  not  |  Western General Hospital
http://www.hgu.mrc.ac.uk/~chrisb |   for |   Edinburgh EH4 2XU, SCOTLAND



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