Bacterial infection=alkaline phosphatase??

Michael Dorsett Onken mdonken at artsci.wustl.edu
Thu Oct 8 11:11:50 EST 1998


Henry Wallace (ultrasonic at worldnet.att.net) wrote:
: Hello All:

: I understand that certain bacterial infections
: in humans cause, as an antibody, intestinal
: alkaline phoshatase. I believe one to be the
: bacteria responsible for "sleeping sickness".
: Are there any others?? Are there any www
: sites which I could consult?

: Thank you, Henry Wallace

I may be off base here, but it sounds like you're refering to an ELISA
(enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay).  This can be used as a test for the
presence of pathogenic microorganisms in the blood.  Essentially, the
blood (or tissue sample) is homogenized and stuck down to the bottom of
several tubes; then antibodies against known pathogens are added to the
tubes, which stick to samples that contain the corresponding microbes.  A
second antibody is added which recognizes other antibodies and is
physically linked to Calf Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (CIAP), which
causes a color change in the tube when certain chemicals (substrates) are
added.  Any sample which contains an infectious agent recognized by the
antibodies will change color, making this a quick, accurate test for known
pathogens.

I ran a MEDLINE search for infection, antibodies, and CIAP, and most of
the records refered to ELISA's.

--
Mike Onken        -. .-.   .-. .-.   .  E-mail:
Molecular Cell    ||X|||\ /|||X|||\ /|   mdonken at artsci.wustl.edu
Biology Program   |/ \|||X|||/ \|||X||  URL:
Washington Univ.  '   `-' `-'   `-' `-   http://madsci.wustl.edu/




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