chemistry question

Justin Cobb jacobb at uiuc.edu
Mon Sep 25 19:42:07 EST 2000


I looked in my biochemistry textbook, but I couldn't find anything really
specific on glycosylation reactions.  However, I'm guessing that the protein
may bind to the UDP constituent of UDP-glucose, phosphorylate UDP-glucose to
release glucose and produce UTP, and then the Arg residue probably binds the
glucose via N-glycosylation.  I'm not sure of this, but I think it might be
a start.  Also, since many glycosylated proteins bear oligosaccaride, this
may be a repeating chain reaction, but I do not have any idea how the
reaction would be terminated.

Again, this is just an educated guess so let me know if this helps,
preferable by email.


--
Justin Cobb
jacobb at uiuc.edu
Junior, Biology-General
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
School of Life Sciences

"Ivan Delgado" <delgadoi at pilot.msu.edu> wrote in message
news:B5F4FBD9.3095%delgadoi at pilot.msu.edu...

Dear All,

    Anybody has an idea what the chemistry of following reaction would be?:

The glycosylation of an Arginine amino acid with the glucose from
UDP-glucose.

    I have a protein that can bind UDP-glucose and glycosylate itself at an
Arginine and I am trying to figure out how this can take place.

    Any ideas or a source of information regarding this question is
appreciated.

    Sincerely,
    Ivan


Ivan J. Delgado Orlic
Graduate Student
MSU-DOE-Plant Research Laboratory
Genetics Department
Michigan State University
178 Wilson Rd.
122 Plant Biology Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1312
Email: delgadoi at pilot.msu.edu
URL: http://www.msu.edu/~delgadoi/
Phone: 517-353-3519
FAX: 517-353-9168

Francis Crick goes to heaven: "'God,' said the angel, 'This is Dr. Crick;
Dr. Crick, this is God.' 'I am so pleased to meet you,' says Francis. 'I
must ask you this question. How do imaginal disks work?'. "'Well,' comes the
reply, 'We took a little bit of this stuff and we added some things to it
and... actually, we don't know, but I can tell you that we've been building
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