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Mon Sep 3 21:32:03 EST 2001



ScientificAmerican.com -- WEEKLY REVIEW                 August 21, 2001



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IN THIS ISSUE

--------------

** ASTRONOMERS SPOT JUPITER-SIZE PLANET ORBITING A NEARBY STAR

** GENETIC DIFFERENCE MAY MAKE HUMANS EASIER TO CLONE THAN SHEEP

** KECK TELESCOPE REVEALS AN INCONSISTENT CONSTANT

** OLD DRUGS SHOW NEW PROMISE IN COMBATING PRION DISEASES

** IQ AND BIRTHWEIGHT LINKED IN NORMAL BIRTHWEIGHT CHILDREN, TOO





Also...ASK THE EXPERTS 

---------------------- 

--HOW DO SQUID AND OCTOPUSES CHANGE COLOR?





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-------------------------- WEEKLY REVIEW ---------------------------



** ASTRONOMERS SPOT JUPITER-SIZE PLANET ORBITING A NEARBY STAR 

Scientists have discovered a planet the size of Jupiter circling a

star in the Big Dipper. This, in combination with another planet 

known to orbit the nearby star, finally reveals a planetary system 

somewhat similar to our own solar system.

http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTX





** GENETIC DIFFERENCE MAY MAKE HUMANS EASIER TO CLONE THAN SHEEP

Having two working copies of a gene that prevents fetal overgrowth 

may make the cloning process less complicated in humans than in 

sheep, according to a new study. Other cloning experts, however, 
charge that the researchers have overinterpreted their results.
http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTY


** KECK TELESCOPE REVEALS AN INCONSISTENT CONSTANT
Constants in physics equations are usually, well, constant. But new 
observations of ancient light indicate that the so-called fine struc-
ture constant is larger now than it was six billion years ago, suggest-
ing that the physics governing our universe could be slowly changing.
http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTZ


** OLD DRUGS SHOW NEW PROMISE IN COMBATING PRION DISEASES
Cell culture studies suggest that two drugs currently used to treat 
malaria and certain psychotic illnesses may also combat infectious 
prion proteins, which cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other fatal 
neurodegenerative disorders. A human clinical trial is planned.
http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTA


** IQ AND BIRTHWEIGHT LINKED IN NORMAL BIRTHWEIGHT CHILDREN, TOO
A number of studies have shown that low birthweight children score
lower on IQ tests at school age. Now new research has revealed a link 
between IQ and birthweight in normal birthweight children. Bigger 
babies, it seems, go on to receive higher scores on intelligence tests.
http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTB


==================== ASK THE EXPERTS ==================
Q: How do squid and octopuses change color?

A: Ellen J. Prager, assistant dean of the University of Miami's 
Rosensteil School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, describes
the physiology of color shifting and explains how certain squid 
produce light, too.
http://sciam.rgc2.com/servlet/cc?lJpDUWEkJqhoglLgFHhsDJhtE0EUTC
=======================================================


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