cDNA naming convention?

Brian Smith-White smithwhi at students.msu.edu
Tue Aug 23 23:06:00 EST 1994


In Article <199408231746.NAA05584 at acpub.duke.edu> "chlamy at ACPUB.DUKE.EDU" says:
> Sam Beale wrote,
> >
> >If a gene is the xyz (italicized) gene and it encodes the ABC protein, is
> >the cDNA refered to as ABC cDNA or xyz (ital) cDNA?
> 
> 
> Partial clarification, or perhaps more confusion:
> 
> The LOCUS (mappable entity) is XYZ1 (all caps), as is the wild type allele
> 
> The mutant ALLELE is xyz1-1 (lower case, italics)
> 
> The GENE represented by this locus is probably Abc1, since the protein has
> been identifed as ABC (although it could conceivably be something else
> yet), and is named if possible in accordance with the conventions set by
> the Commission on Plant Genome Nomenclature.  
> 
> But I don't know how to name the cDNA either - any ideas?
> 
> 
> Real-life examples:
> 
> Locus NIT1 
> 
> Mutant nit1-1  (formerly nit-1)
> 
> Gene Nia1 (CPGN terminology, see Plant Mol. Biol. Reporter, supplement to
> vol. 12, no. 2, p. S102)
> 
> Gene product nitrate reductase
> 
> 
> ----
> 
> Locus PF14
> 
> Mutant pf14 or pf14-1 (formerly pf-14)
> 
> Gene RS3 (or whatever the CPGN ultimately calls it)
> 
> Gene product radial spoke protein 3
> 
> Elizabeth Harris
> chlamy at acpub.duke.edu
> 
> 
Does "cDNA" mean the sequence of the insert isolated? If so, the name is the
CPGN name. If "cDNA" means the physical piece of DNA, than the name is the 
name of the plasmid since the piece of DNA is associated with a replicon.
Plasmid naming is described in Novick et al. (1976) Bacteriol. Rev. 40, 168. 
Plasmid prefix designations should be checked, and registered, with Esther
Lederberg. The Genetics Society directory lists her address as the Dept. 
Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford U. Med. Sch. Rm 5402, Palo Alto, CA
94305-2499. 
Regards,		Brian Smith-White




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