Sandia National Laboratories Workshop (please post)

Sorin C. Istrail scistra at cs.sandia.gov
Tue Jan 16 15:19:16 EST 1996


 
  Second Sandia National Laboratories Workshop on _/_/_/_/  _/    _/  _/  
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       COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY          _/_/_/_/  _/ _/ _/  _/            
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        Organized in collaboration with the

      NSF Center for Discrete Mathematics and 
         Theoretical Computer Science
 (A Consortium of Rutgers and Princeton Universities, 
          AT&T Bell Labs, and Bellcore)

               March 4-6, 1996
               Albuquerque, NM     


  Funded by DOE MICS Office of Scientific Computing
      Applied Mathematical Sciences Program
            Dr. Fred Howes, Director


         ** Preliminary Announcement **


The 2nd Sandia National Laboratories Workshop on Computational
Molecular Biology will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March
4-6, 1996. The Workshop is organized in collaboration with DIMACS
for the Special Year on Mathematical Support for Molecular Biology.

The workshop will focus on open problems and research directions 
in Computational Molecular Biology. In addition to talks given by 
active researchers in this field, several plenary lectures will be 
presented by speakers of highest distinction in computational 
molecular biology.

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Ken Dill (University of California San Francisco)
 "Protein Folding: Simple Computational Models"

Richard Karp (University of Washington) 
 "Combinatorial Aspects of Restriction Mapping"

Martin Karplus (Harvard University)
 "Simulations of Protein Folding: From the Native to the Denatured
  State and Back Again"

Jonathan King (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
 "Protein Folding, Protein Misfolding, and Human Disease"

Irwin Kuntz (University of California San Francisco)
 "Mathematical Issues in Molecular Recognition"

Michael Waterman (University of Southern California)
 TBA

SPEAKERS

Stephen Altschul (NIH, National Center for Biotechnology Information)
 "Heuristics for Searching Sequence Databases"

Steve Bryant (NIH, National Center for Biotechnology Information)
 TBA

Martin Farach (Rutgers University)
 "Efficient Algorithms for Inverting Evolution"

William Hart (Sandia National Laboratories)
 "New Protein Folding Algorithms with Near-optimal Performance"
 
Nat Goodman (Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research)
 "The Data Management Systems Used to Map the Human and Mouse 
  Genomes at the Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research"

John Kececioglu (University of Georgia)
 "Computing Optimal Multiple Sequence Alignments"

Pavel Pevzner (University of Southern California)
 "Gene Recognition: Combinatorics versus Statistics"

R. Ravi (Carnegie-Mellon Unviersity)
 "Approximation Algorithms in Computational Biology"

Ron Shamir (Tel-Aviv University)
 "How Hard is the Integration of Physical Maps?"

Sylvia Spengler (University of California at Berkeley)
 TBA

Tandy Warnow (University of Pennsylvania)
 "New Fast Algorithms for Finding Optimal Evolutionary Trees"


About the Speakers
------------------

Ken Dill is Professor of Chemistry in the Department of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry at the University of California San Francisco and the director 
of the UCSF Center for Statistical Mechanics of Macromolecules. His 
research revolutionized the thinking about protein folding and has 
provided fundamental insight into the principles of protein folding.  
He has made major contributions in the understanding of the hydrophobic 
effect. Areas of interest: protein folding, statistical mechanics of 
biomolecules.

Richard Karp is Professor of Computer Science at University of 
Washington. He is the recipient of the 1985 ACM Turing Award (the 
"Nobel Prize" in Computing) and a member of the National Academy of 
Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Areas of interest: 
Combinatorial algorithms and their application in molecular biology.

Martin Karplus is Theodore William Richards Professor of Chemistry at 
Harvard University and Professeur Conventionne at the Universite Louis 
Pasteur. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences, International Academy of Quantum Molecular 
Science and recipient of numerous awards. His research is in theoretical 
chemistry, including electronic interpretations of NMR and ESR spectra
of molecules, the development of techniques for evaluation of molecular 
properties, and the formulation of detailed models for chemical reactions.
His recent work is concerned with molecules that play an important role 
in living systems. He is one of the top researchers in the field of 
protein folding and his contributions have been of fundamental importance 
to the development of protein folding research. 

Jonathan King is Professor of Biology in the Department of Biology at 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and director of the MIT Biomedical 
Electron Microscope Facility. He is Councillor of the Biophysical 
Society and a recipient of the Antartic Service Medal of the National 
Science Foundation.  Areas of interest: the folding of large proteins, 
the structure and assembly of virus particles, and the genetic control 
of biological assembly processes.

Irwin Kuntz is professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry at 
the University of California, San Francisco, Director of the UCSF 
Molecular Design Institute and the 1996 UCSF Faculty Lecturer. 
He is one of the most influential pioneers in the area of rational 
drug design, the creator of the DOCK drug design program and the 
developer of the distance geometry methods widely used in biochemistry. 
Areas of interest: protein folding, protein structure determination, 
and ligand-macromolecule interactions.

Michael Waterman is the USC Endowed Associates Chair Professor of 
Mathematics and Biological Sciences at the University of Southern 
California. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences.  His pioneering research in global 
sequence alignment, predicting RNA secondary structures and inferring 
evolutionary histories established rigorous foundations that fostered the 
development of the field of Computational Molecular Biology. He is the 
co-author of the Smith-Waterman local alignment algorithm, and the 
co-author of the Lander-Waterman formulas for the analysis and design of 
physical mapping experiments.  Areas of interest: computational 
molecular biology.

Stephen Altschul is a Senior Investigator at the National Center for 
Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health. Areas of 
interest:  algorithms and scoring systems for biological sequence 
comparison.

Steve Bryant is a Senior Investigator at the National Center for 
Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health. 

Martin Farach is Associate Professor of Computer Science at Rutgers 
University.  Areas of interest: algorithmic phylogeny, string matching, 
design and analysis of combinatorial algorithms.

William Hart is a Computational Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. 
Areas of interest: computational biology, stochastic methods for global 
optimization.

Nat Goodman is a Senior Research Scientist at the Whitehead Institute for
Biomedical Research, Associate Director of the Whitehead/MIT Center for
Genome Research, and Senior Staff Scientist at the Jackson Laboratory.  
Areas of interest: informatics systems for genomics.

John Kececioglu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the 
University of Georgia. Areas of interest: algorithms for DNA sequence 
assembly, genome rearrangements, and multiple sequence alignment.

Pavel Pevzner is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of 
Southern California. Areas of interest: computational molecular biology.

R. Ravi is an Assistant Professor of Operations Research at Carnegie-Mellon 
University. Areas of interest: approximation algorithms in molecular biology,
combinatorial optimization.

Ron Shamir is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Tel-Aviv 
University. Areas of interest: algorithms for genomic mapping, algorithmic 
graph theory and optimization.

Sylvia Spengler is a Professor of Biology at Berkeley University.

Tandy Warnow is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at University of 
Pennsylvania. Areas of interest: combinatorial optimization problems in 
phylogenetic tree construction, and methodological advances in historical 
linguistics.
------------------------------------------------------------------

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Martin Farach (Rutgers University and DIMACS)
Nathan Goodman (Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research)   
Sorin Istrail (Sandia National Laboratories)
Pavel Pevzner (University of Southern California)

ORGANIZING COMITTEE

The workshop is hosted by the members of the OSC Sandia National 
Laboratories Computational Biology Project. Organizing Committee: 
Sarina Bromberg, David Greenberg, William E. Hart, Sorin Istrail, 
and Cynthia Phillips.

WORKSHOP LOCATION

The Workshop will take place at the Albuquerque Hilton, 1901 University Blvd, 
Albuquerque, NM 87102. For reservations call (505) 884-2500 or 800-274-6835. 
When making the reservation please mention the name of the workshop to
obtain the workshop rates.

The workshop is open to the public and no registration fee is required.
For more information read the workshop web page

     http://www.cs.sandia.gov/tech_reports/compbio/snl_workshop96.html

send email or call:

Sorin Istrail, Workshop Chair
Sandia National Laboratories                     
Massively Parallel Computing Research Laboratory 
Dept. 9223: Algorithms and Discrete Mathematics  
Mailing Address: Sandia National Laboratories
		 MS 1110
		 P.O. Box 5800
		 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1110                       

Phone    : (505) 845-7612                            
Fax      : (505) 845-7442   
Secretary: (505) 845-7432                         
Email    : scistra at cs.sandia.gov                     
www      : http://www.cs.sandia.gov/~scistra         











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