Event Detection and Response Workshop Announcement

InterRidge Office intridge at durham.ac.uk
Tue Nov 19 12:38:43 EST 1996


**************************************************************************
                                 ANNOUNCEMENT OF

                                   A WORKSHOP ON

           THE DETECTION OF AND RAPID RESPONSE TO

         VOLCANIC EVENTS ON THE MID-OCEAN RIDGE

                                 SEATTLE, WA, USA

                               4th - 6th MARCH 1997

   CONVENORS:  J. Cowen, R. Embley, M. Lilley, H. Milburn

SPONSORS:  NSF RIDGE Program and NOAA VENTS Program

           REGISTRATION DEADLINE:  3rd JANUARY 1997

                          REPLY TO: ridge at unh.edu

This announcement is posted on the RIDGE website at :
http://ridge.unh.edu/announcement/edr_announce.html

Apologies to those of you who also received this announcement via RIDGE las=
t
week.
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      One of the most exciting new areas, for both the NSF RIDGE and NOAA
VENTS Programs, during the past decade has been the detection of, and
response to, volcanic events on the mid-ocean ridge.  The discovery of the
megaplumes on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge in the mid-1980s underscored
the potential scientific importance of volcanic events for understanding
hydrothermal input into the ocean, and the chemical and biologic studies of
the Cleft, 9=B0N, CoAxial, and most recently, the Gorda Ridge eruption site=
s
have provided new opportunities for studies of the evolution of hydrotherma=
l
systems, the subseafloor biosphere and the geologic nature of crustal
accretion.  With the second successful detection and response using the NE
Pacific SOSUS system in 1996 on the northern Gorda Ridge, it is clear that
we now have an accurate system for detection of volcanic intrusion/eruption=
s
on one portion of the Mid-Ocean Ridge.

        It is clear even with the limited number of events analyzed to date
that this area of MOR research poses both an opportunity and a major
scientific/technical challenge for the future.  These studies pose a major
challenge because some of the most intriguing and potentially rewarding
chemical and biologic processes associated with these events appear to deca=
y
rapidly with time.  The two events so far detected in the NE Pacific
generated event plumes during the first few days of activity (probably
associated with the major intrusion/eruption).  In the case of the CoAxial
event, the event plumes moved off axis and were not relocated.  Event plume=
s
were relocated over the Gorda Ridge more than three months after the onset
of the most intense seismic episodes using a RAFOS float.

        The rapid response efforts for the CoAxial and Gorda events have
been impressive.  At the same time, it is clear that there were missed
opportunities because of the lack of community preparedness and
technological development.

        Although several workshops within the past decade have discussed th=
e
importance of Mid-Ocean Ridge Event Detection and Response, there has not
been an opportunity for the community to discuss the science, logistics and
technology of the detection and response to volcanic events in the SOSUS
detection era.  The general goals of the 1997 workshop will be: (1) to
identify the most critical hypothesis-driven science and the relevant
measurements to be made during the initial phase of a dyking/eruptive event
and the technology needed to do so, (2) to produce a plan that would be a
practical template for rapid response that could be used as a guide for
scientists, engineers, and program managers interested in taking part in
this activity, and (3) to nurture the community networking that is crucial
to the success of an activity that is critically dependent on a high level
of communication and coordination.

        In order to accomplish this, the workshop will specifically focus
on: (1) needs and methods for enhancement of event detection, (2) scientifi=
c
questions/hypotheses that are/could be addressed by rapid response,
particularly during the steepest portion of the decay curve (days to weeks)=
,
and (3) the technology, logistics, and techniques for making measurements
during the initial phase of the event (days to weeks).  We anticipate that =
a
five year plan for rapid event response in the north-east Pacific can be
distilled from the workshop.  We also will discuss longer-range
opportunities for real-time detection and rapid response on other portions
of the Mid-Ocean Ridge.  The success of the workshop will be dependent on
the desire of the participants to immerse themselves in a multidisciplinary
workshop that will include chemists, geologists, modelers, biologists (micr=
o
and macro), oceanographers and engineers.

People interested in participating in this workshop should apply, using the
form below, to the RIDGE Office no later than JANUARY 3, 1997 at:
RIDGE Office, OPAL, University of New Hampshire, 39 College Rd., Morse Hall=
,
Durham, NH 03824-3525, USA; Phone:  +1 (603) 862-4501; Fax:  +1 (603)
862-0083; Email:  ridge at unh.edu.

For questions on the workshop, contact Jim Cowen (jcowen at soest.hawaii.edu),
Bob Embley (embley at pmel.noaa.gov), Marvin Lilley (lilley at u.washington.edu),
or Hugh Milburn (milburn at pmel.noaa.gov)
________________________________________________________

DETECTION AND RAPID RESPONSE APPLICATION FORM
                           Due by January 3, 1997

Name:

E-mail Address:

Mailing Address:

Phone:

FAX:

Indicate if Student or Post-Doc:

Specific Area of Interest/Expertise in Event Detection and Rapid Response:

________________________________________________________





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