Serological Controls in Test Kits

Michael G. Kurilla mgk2r at UVA.PCMAIL.VIRGINIA.EDU
Thu Nov 2 17:27:33 EST 1995


On Nov 2,  2:14pm, MHughes77 at aol.com wrote:
> Subject: Serological Controls in Test Kits
> To fellow Diagnostics Newsgroup members:
> 
> I am a scientist at a small diagnostics company involved in developing
rapid,
> easy-to-use tests designed to be used primarily in doctors' clinics or
> veterinary practices for diagnosing a wide variety of infectious diseases,
as
> well as for screening donated blood for infectious agents.  Our kits come
> with ready-to-use reagents in dropper bottles and have good stability for
> 12-18 months at 4 degrees C and 3-6 months at room temperature.  We would
> like to be able to offer human serological controls for some of the test
> kits, preferably with the same desirable stability characteristics.
> 
> Perhaps some of you would have some information or suggestions regarding
the
> following questions we have:
> 
> 1. What is the best way to inactivate viruses without appreciably affecting
> the antibody and/or antigen activity?

There are probably many ways to do this. Psoralen is one method that is
fairly specific for nucleic acid and protein sparing. At least tests with
virally infected cells have not shown loss of antibody reactivity or T cell
proliferative changes after treamtent.







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