MINOXIDIL

Dr Rob Harling ESA009 at ED.SAC.AC.UK
Mon Oct 16 05:44:36 EST 1995


> Date:          Mon, 16 Oct 95 08:54:11
> From:          <erwan.leroy at cipcinsa.insa-lyon.fr>
> Subject:       MINOXIDIL
> To:            mx%"diagnost at net.bio.net"
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> Subject: MINOXIDIL
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> From: Erwan Le Roy <Erwan.LeRoy at cipcinsa.insa-lyon.fr>
> Date: 15 Oct 1995 09:36:28 GMT
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> I am loosing my hair.
> COuld somebody help me. Is minoxidil good what is it?
> 
> 
> 
>
Minoxidil is a product from the Upjohn Co.;  it is licensed, at least 
in the UK (where it is called Regaine), for male pattern baldness, 
ie natural baldness.  
Trials have shown some limited success against alopecia areata, the patchy 
kind of hair loss, but not for the totalis/universalis kind where all 
hair drops out.  It is expensive, particularly if you buy supplies 
from a private hair care clinic as opposed to a pharmacy;  it is a 
long term treatment, months or years, and if successful, may need to 
be continued indefinitely or newly - grown hair may drop out again.   

There is no certain cure for alopecia;  some people respond to 
certain treatments better than others, others do not respond at all, 
others get spontaneously better.  Perhaps before rushing out to buy 
minoxidil you should try and get your hands on a drug called 
diphencyprone (DPC).  It is made by the Kodak photographic company - it was 
never intended as a drug, but photographic workers who came into 
contact with it found that they sprouted hair in unwanted places.  
I suggest you try and get an appointment with the Dermatology clinic 
at your local hospital and ask if they can arrange a course of 
treatment with DPC. It is applied topically to the patchy areas.
In the UK it is only available experimentally 
through clinics, as far as I am aware.   DPC is possibly more 
effective than minoxidil, but this is anecdotal.  

If you cannot get hold of DPC, try a herbalist for some Primula 
obconica;  this is supposed to work in the same way as DPC, by 
inducing a localised (maybe even systemic) allergic reaction to 
counteract the auto - immune response which causes alopecia.  

I wish you success with this distressing condition.  I should add 
that I am not a qualified physician, but I have an interest in auto - 
immune disorders;  needless to say any action you take on the above 
is at your own risk.  



 

Dr Rob Harling
SAC (Scottish Agricultural College)/
  University of Edinburgh
West Mains Road
Edinburgh EH9 3JG
Scotland, UK
tel: +44 (0)131 535 4000
fax: +44 (0)131 667 2601
e mail: esa009 at ed.sac.ac.uk




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