Fruit fly attractants was Re: You are all Dogless people!

James SHOTTER fkzwpn at echidna.stu.cowan.edu.au
Wed Apr 2 12:55:41 EST 1997



On Wed, 2 Apr 1997, A.J. Davis wrote:
> Hallo All,
> What Drosophila fruit flies are "attracted" to depends on 
> the species - but whether we're really talking about 
> attraction i.e. long distance orientation to a source, or 
> arrestment i.e. staying longer at a source once encountered 
> is something of an open question.  Even within a closely 
> spaced array of similar sources not all are necessarily 
> found by Drosophila which suggests a strong random element 
> in encounters.
> a.j.davis at uk.ac.leeds


G'day from WA mate!  (Good day from Western Australia, my good fellow!)

And then follow by population crash should the food source, eg rotting 
fruit, be consumed or be removed.  How about founder-effect on Drosophila 
gene pool/flow ?  WHat do you think?

(BTW, while the adolescents are 'attracted' to their newsgroup, I thought 
I'd also mentioned some notes about a non-poisonous snake species in my area:


"
I saw a Stimpsons python yesterday, the first time in two years (the average
find frequency); well, the magpies found it in the neighbours place. The
whole, local family of Australian magpies was there: about 14 birds, and 
10 or so lined up on a fence above the poor, snake! Well, I soon saw
the camoflaged 1 metre 'find', picked it up by it's tail and put in in a
container before it realised what was happening; showed my parents and
'relocated' it 100 metres away on a crown land/ nature reserve away from
the neighbours (who may be clueless about snakes)."


CHeerio
Regards,
James Shotter
Student,
biological and environment sciences,
Edith Cowan University, Perth.




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