Flies and CO2

Martin Cann mjcann at MAIL.MED.CORNELL.EDU
Wed Feb 19 09:19:23 EST 1997


>Since one can use less CO2 than N2 to achieve the same state of non-moving
>flies, I would suspect that CO2 anesthesia does more than just displace
>oxygen.  My best guess would be that a ventilation/perfusion mismatch >>is
>induced, causing a respiratory acidosis, which probably causes
>unconsciousness (at least, the flies do not move any more).  This does >an
>awful lot of extrapolating from vertebrate models, however.

Exactly,  this is the problem, acidosis verses oxygen replacement.  Does
insect haemolymph use a primarily CO2/HCO3- buffering system or somthing
else.  I thought it was a stretch but not impossible.  I would have
thought O2 replacement personally to keep the flies down rather than
acidosis as young flies can survive quite long under these conditions
and that would be pretty impressive if you are completely messing with
their physiology.

Martin



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