frustule separation

Richard Gordon ms on iBook GordonR at Ms.UManitoba.CA
Fri Aug 30 12:17:33 EST 2002


Dear Brent,
I recall that someone, in the 1960s, separated Drosophila parts by 
freezing them at dry ice or liquid nitrogen temperatures, and bouncing 
them against a hard surface. Perhaps someone on the Drosophila list 
could supply a reference? I tried and can't find one, even on Flybase 
(http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu/).
Yours, -Dick Gordon

On Thursday, August 29, 2002, at 01:50 PM, Brent Bellinger wrote:

> I was wondering if there is a way to split the the frustules of a 
> diatom (centric) without damaging them.  Mechanical and chemical 
> methods of dividing would be appreciated (if both exist) so as to 
> assertain which does the least amount of frustule damage.  Cells will 
> be dead and we will try to align the frustule halves in a sheet.  Can 
> it be done?  Thank you for the help.
>
> Brent Bellinger
>
> Graduate Student-Department of Biological Sciences
>
> Michigan Tech. University
>
> Houghton, MI 49931
>
> (906)483-8150
>
>  
>
> "You only live once, and the way I live, once is enough."           
> -Frank Sinatra
..........................................................................
.........................
Dr. Richard Gordon, Depts. of Radiology/Electrical & Computer 
Engineering, U.Manitoba, Room GA216, Health Sciences Centre,
820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB R3A 1R9 Canada
Adjunct: TRLabs, Chair: Winnipeg IEEE/EMBS
http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/medicine/radiology/stafflist/rgordon.html
GordonR at ms.UManitoba.ca. Try Reprint Hunter:
http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/medicine/radiology/search/universities.html
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