Life Sciences Informatics: From Data to Drugs

Laura Wood laura.wood at researchandmarkets.com
Thu Jun 19 15:53:11 EST 2003


I enclose details of our latest biotechnology report.

Data collection, storage, analysis, and sharing are critical tasks in drug discovery and development companies. This report navigates the rapidly-evolving landscape of bioinformatics technologies, and assesses which ones are key to productivity and success.

This Report Analyzes the Following Key Trends:

- How pharmaceutical companies are spending their IT budgets.
- Ways in which life science companies are leveraging the information they have through systems biology (i.e., pathways and network analysis) and/or knowledge management.
- How bioinformatics technologies may address key unmet needs in proteomics.
- The future role of, and potential market for, bioinformatics in genomics-driven or -enabled drug discovery and development companies.

Overview:

Informatics are essential at every step of genomics-based drug discovery and development. However, over the last couple of years, the commercial landscape of life sciences information technology has changed dramatically. The field of bioinformatics, in particular, has gone through a dramatic boom/bust. At the same time, a large number of IT companies are looking to the drug discovery and development arena as a new market opportunity. Pharmaceutical companies, meanwhile, are faced with rising pressure to reduce or at least control costs, and have a growing need for new informatics tools to help manage the influx of data from genomics, and turn that data into tomorrow's drugs.

Life Sciences Informatics: From Data to Drugs is a new Life Science report that examines the overall landscape of bioinformatics and highlights those approaches, and companies pursuing them, that will likely address the indus-try's evolving needs. Key IT tools, such as high-performance computing, Web services, and grids, that are being used to improve the speed and efficiency of drug discovery and development are also discussed.

It's now clear that selling bioinformatics data and/or software is a tricky business model. Furthermore, true breakthroughs are still lacking, particularly in key areas such as gene prediction, data mining, protein structure modeling and prediction, and modeling of complex biological systems. However, most experts agree that IT and bioinformatics are essential to reaching the improved productivity the pharmaceutical industry craves. The problem is not the quality of the software and hardware-rather, the difficulty lies in bringing the new laboratory tools to full maturity, teaching biologists how to manage high-throughput experiments and the data they generate, and sharing and integrating all this data in a meaningful way. The ultimate goal is to take the data from all these types of studies and to generate detailed models of complex systems, particularly biological pathways. Life Sciences Informatics: From Data to Drugs is crucial reading for companies seeking to reach that goal.

Thought Leaders Interviewed for This Report:

Howard Asher, Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Jeffrey Augen, TurboWorx; Dejan Bojanic, Millennium Pharmaceuticals; Geoffrey Duyk, Exelixis; Jack Elands, IDBS Ltd.; David Finkelstein, Affymetrix; Nat Goodman, Institute for Systems Biology; Andrew Grimshaw, Avaki; John Helfrich, NuGenesis; Roberta Katz, EMC Corporation; Carol Kovak, IBM; Eric Meyers and Jack Pollard, 3rd Millennium; Alan Roter, Iconix Pharmaceuticals; Yury Rozenman, formerly of Platform Computing (now with IBM Life Sciences); Mick Savage, Consultant; Shiv Tasker, formerly of Blackstone Computing (now with Tribiosys); Bernard P. Wess, Jr., PERSEID Software Ltd.

For a complete index of this report click on http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/19842

Report Index:

1.0 Business and Technology Overview: A Rapidly Evolving Industry
     1.1 Unmet Needs: Essential Tools for Expanding Demands
     1.2 Emerging Opportunities: Profiting During a Boom/Bust Cycle
     1.3 Evolving Technologies

2.0 Current and Emerging Technologies
     2.1 High-Throughput Approaches
          Sequence Analysis
          Comparative Genomics
          Gene Expression Analysis
          Protein Expression Analysis
          Protein-Protein Interactions/Complexes
          Protein Structure
          Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms
          Gene/Protein Function
          Metabolomics/Metabonomics
     2.2 Data Collection
     2.3 Data Integration
     2.4 Data Mining and Visualization
     2.5 In Silico Modeling of Networks and Pathways
     2.6 Knowledge Management
     2.7 Key Information Technology Advances

3.0 The Life Sciences Information Technology Market
     3.1 Deals
     3.2 Breakthroughs Needed
     3.3 Fundamental Issues and Challenges
     3.4 Building Up for Systems Biology
     3.5 What Next?

4.0 Expert Commentaries

Howard Asher, Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Jeffrey Augen, TurboWorx; Dejan Bojanic, Millennium Pharmaceuticals; Geoffrey Duyk, Exelixis; Jack Elands, IDBS Ltd.; David Finkelstein, Affymetrix; Nat Goodman, Institute for Systems Biology; Andrew Grimshaw, Avaki; John Helfrich, NuGenesis; Roberta Katz, EMC Corporation; Carol Kovak, IBM; Eric Meyers and Jack Pollard, 3rd Millennium; Alan Roter, Iconix Pharmaceuticals; Yury Rozenman, Platform Computing; Mick Savage, Consultant; Shiv Tasker, formerly of Blackstone Computing; Bernard P. Wess, Jr., PERSEID Software Ltd.

5.0 Vital Business Statistics of Key Players

Accelrys
AnVil Inc. (formerly AnVil Informatics)
Apple Computer
Argentys
Avaki Corporation
BioDiscovery
BioSift
EMC Corporation
Entelos
eResearch Technology
GeneCodes
GeneData
Gene-IT
Gene Logic
Hewlett Packard (Compaq)
Hitachi Data Systems
IBM
InforMax
LabBook, Inc.
LION bioscience
MolecularWare
Network Appliance
Nonlinear Dynamics
Physiome Sciences
Platform Computing
Scimagix
SciQuest, Inc.
SciTegic
Silicon Genetics
Spotfire
Sun Microsystems
Textco Molecular Biology (merged with SciQuest, Inc.)
TimeLogic
Tripos
TurboWorx (formerly Turbogenomics)

Appendix A: Selected "Public/Free" Analytical Tools for Microarray Studies

Appendix B: Bioinformatics Related Deals

Glossary

Index 


Report Pricing:

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Site Licence   EUR 5,350

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Bioinformatics: Getting Results in the Era of High-Throughput Genomics
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Click on http://www.researchandmarkets.com for details.

Thank you for your consideration.

Kind Regards,


Laura Wood
Senior Manager
Research and Markets Ltd
laura.wood at researchandmarkets.com

REPORT DATA SUMMARY:
Life Sciences Informatics: From Data to Drugs
Publisher Name: Cambridge Healthtech Institute
Date Published: 04/04/03
Number of Pages: 100
Category: Biotechnology
URL: www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/19842

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