chemo/leukemia

Frederick Garbrecht FRED at bmt.mcw.edu
Thu Oct 27 10:08:05 EST 1994


> To:            immunology at net.bio.net
> From:          ejf at welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Ephraim Fuchs)
> Subject:       Re: chemo/leukemia
> Date:          26 Oct 1994 21:43:09 GMT

> In article <38hqje$m0f at ixnews1.ix.netcom.com>,
> Kate Pierson <kathryn1 at ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> >do chemo and/ or leukemia make one infertile?
> 
> Chemo for leukemia can and usually does.  The leukemia itself does not.
> That will be $50 please.
> 
> 
> 
Not necessarily true!  The risk of gonadal dysfunction after 
chemotherapy probably is dependent on both the intensity and type of 
chemotherapy used.  High dose alkylator therapy certainly causes 
gonadal dysfunction, but long term fertility is not precluded.  It 
used to be that most boys received testicular irradiation 
prophylactically, and this certainly is associated with a loss of 
fertility; this treatment is not so common now, so complete gonadal 
failure related to irradiation is less common in boys treated for 
leukemia.  There have even been scattered reports of successful 
pregnancies to women who have received extremely intensive therapy 
associated with bone marrow transplantation.  While these few cases 
are clearly the exception, it suggests there is a fairly broad range 
of tolerance for gonadal function in patients treated with 
chemotherapy (and/or irradiation).

I think you should return the $50  :->


Frederick C. Garbrecht
fred at bmt.mcw.edu
Bone Marrow Transplant Program
Medical College of Wisconsin
phone 414 257 5053
fax   414 257 7994



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