Allergy to Fragrances

Betty Bridges bcb56 at ix.netcom.com
Mon Oct 16 15:03:20 EST 1995


In <jdastw-121095123856 at jdastw.monsanto.com> jdastw at ccmail.monsanto.com
(Jim Astwood) writes: 
>
>In article <45e18i$ij2 at newsbf02.news.aol.com>, karenle at aol.com
(KarenLe)
>wrote:
>
>> Since 1982, I have had the same allergies to fragrances as you;
however, I
>> do not go into anaphylatic shock...I sneeze, eyes water, and get a
>> tremendous headache.
>> 
>> I was told that the "fragrance" listed on the ingredients is
actually made
>> of formaldehyde, and that is what causes the allergies..
>> 
>> 
>> karenle
>
>Fragrances are definatley *not* formaldehyde.  Formaldehyde is an OSHA
>controlled substance, and is not apporaved for cosmetic uses.  In the
>lumber industry for example, formaldehyde is used in particle-board,
and
>the lumber itself is labelled accordingly.

According to The Cosmetic Handbook put out by the FDA, formldehyde is
allowed in cosmetics.



FDA/IAS* Booklet:  1992
 
                        COSMETICS HANDBOOK
 
This page handbook contains valuable information on FDA's
requirements and policies for safe production and accurate
labeling of cosmetics.  The material in it has been carefully
selected for use in the production and distribution of cosmetic
products.
 
The handbook is composed of five sections:
 
1.  Regulatory Requirements for Marketing
 
2.  Cosmetic Good Manufacturing Practice Guidelines - Cosmetic
Establishments Self-Inspection Guidelines as Excerpted from FDA's
Inspection Operations Manual
 
3.  Cosmetic Product-Related Regulatory Requirements and Health
Hazard Issues as Excerpted from FDA's Inspection Operations
Manual
 
4.  Permanently & Provisionally Listed Color Additives
 
5.  How to Obtain FDA Cosmetic Regulation


              Regulatory Requirements for Marketing
                 Cosmetics in the United States

..............................cut.....................................

The FD&C Act defines cosmetics as articles intended to be applied
to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting
attractiveness, or altering the ap-pearance without affecting the
body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are
products such as skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks,
fingernail polishes, eye and facial make-up preparations,
shampoos, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, deodorants,
and any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic
product. Soap products consisting primarily of an alkali salt of
fatty acid and making no label claim other than cleansing of the
hu-man body are not considered cosmetics under the law.

........................cut...........................................

The use of the following ingredients is either restric-ted or
prohibited in cosmetics: bithionol, mercury compounds, vinyl
chloride, halogenated salicylanilides, zirconium complexes in
aerosol cosmetics, chloroform, methylene chloride,
chlorofluorocarbon propellants, and hexachlorophene. See 21 CFR
700.11 to 700.23 and 250.250. The agency also considers as
adulterated cosmetic nail products containing methyl methacrylate
monomer or those containing more than 5% formaldehyde. Although
not prohibited by law or regulation, in addition, the
manufacturers of cosmetic fragrance products have voluntarily
agreed to not use or to limit maximum use levels of certain
selected ingredients which have been found to cause
depigmentation, irritant, neurotoxic, or phototoxic or other
allergic reactions.
......................................................................

I think I read somewhere the cosmetic industry voluntarily agreed not
to use more than 2% formaldehyde in cosmetic products.  So unless
something has changed since this handbook was published formaldehyde is
still used in cosmetics.

The entire handbook may be read at web site 
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd?cosmetm.html

I'm still checking on the question of feline scent glands being used

Betty Bridges



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