Chemical sensititazation

Steve Emerson semerson at teleport.com
Sun Aug 4 12:57:36 EST 1996


charles mccarthy (pandoc at ix.netcom.com) wrote:
: In <4u14bi$46q at nadine.teleport.com> semerson at teleport.com (Steve
: Emerson) writes: 
: [edit]
: >Fatigue, edema, amplified pain, and memory problems are all consistent
: >with a dopamine-deficiency.
: >semerson at teleport.COM  Public Access User -- Not affiliated with
: Teleport

: Do you think that immune system messenger molecules could be playing a
: role in dopamine depletion secondary to exogenous chemical activation
: of immune system cells?

That's over my head.  I do think that the process is some kind of
misguided protective response.  There is something called MAOB
which breaks down dopamine, and I thought this may play a role.
I believe that there is some biochemical deficiency, due
to genetic inheritance or nutritional deficiency, which
permits this strange biochemistry to be created and to
deplete the transmitters on exposure.  The "sensitization"
does appear to me to be two events: 1) the creation/activation
of some errant biochemistry which depletes the neurotransmitters
on exposure, and 2) the transmitter deficiencies themselves,
and a positive feedback loop such that greater transmitter
deficiencies increase the sensitivity of the errant biochemistry
to exogenous chemicals.

I would like to stress, to those unfamiliar with this condition,
that these acute transmitter deficits are not thought-induced
by anxiety etc., for two reasons: 1) the person is not always
conscious of the exposure (and may not be conscious of
exposures for years because the symptoms aren't severe or
acute enough), or may become conscious of the exposure only
N minutes/hours into the exposure, when symptoms start to
get worse, and 2) a dopamine-deficient imbalance is not
consistent with an axious mood, rather this mood is consistent
with a serotonin-deficient imbalance.

The progression of the illness is that with the years the person
reacts to more chemicals and at lower doses.  Eventually, the
person can become a "universal reactor", and can no longer
tolerate most indoor environments.

I am trying to "do my part" in bringing attention to this 
condition, so that more people in the medical and scientific
community will accept it as a real and investigate it.
It seems that it would be fairly easy to research this, i.e.
simply test serotonin/dopamine levels before and after
exposure, and make sure you control for thougt-induced effects.

--

semerson at teleport.COM  Public Access User -- Not affiliated with Teleport



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