Grouse shooting and AIDS

David L. Haviland, Ph.D. dhavilan at IMM2.IMM.UTH.TMC.EDU
Tue Sep 29 17:42:06 EST 1998


At 21:27 9/29/98 GMT, Carlton Hogan wrote:
>In article <6ugg99$n22 at dfw-ixnews10.ix.netcom.com>,
>George M. Carter <gmc0 at ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>>Donald Forsdyke <forsdyke at post.queensu.ca> wrote:
>>
>>snip...
>>
>>>    In the AIDS context, the guns are drugs such as AZT and (recently)
>>>the complex of drugs known as HAART. These hit AIDS viruses "on the
>>>wing", but are useless against latent virus which hides usually in DNA
>>>form seamlessly integrated into the DNA of its host cell. We need drugs
>>>to simulate the beaters. In 1991 it was suggested that cytokines such as
>>>TNF-alpha might fill this role. Recently some major laboratories have
>>>taken this up. For further details see the references below. 
>>
>>Eek.  I think this idea is nuts.  Also, I believe there were studies
>>of TNF.  In any event, TNF may well be part of the problem.  To the
>>extent that a) AIDS is partly due to the death of many UNinfected CD4
>>cells and b) that excessive cell-death may be due in part to excessive
>>levels of TNF, this approach seems dangerous.
>
>Also, TNF is able to bind the tar element of the LTR when no tat
>is present, and initiate transcription. This was an unfortunate 
>side effect noted by F. Wong-Staahl when she was testing anti-tat
>compounds. She was able to reduce tat concentrations nearly to zero,
>but replication still occurred in the presence of TNF

The last thing I am is an AIDS expert; however,  I wonder if this is the
same thing?     

I do recall an old (about 1992) conversation with a group of other
immunologist, some of which were T-cell "folk".  I recall the conversation
centering around a clinical study where HIV infected patients were given
TNF to "hopefully" reduce the kaposi sarcomas.  I don't recall the number
of patients involved with the study but I recall hearing that all TNF
treated patients quickly progressed to full blown AIDS and dying shortly
thereafter.  It was a somber "hindsight" discussion where it was mentioned
that a few months after this study, TNF was found to bind to tat(?) and
initiated viral transcription.

Can anyone shed anymore light on this for me?

Many thanks,
David


  
=============================
 David L. Haviland, Ph.D.
 Asst. Prof. Immunology 
 University of Texas - Houston, H.S.C.
 Institute of Molecular Medicine  
 2121 W. Holcombe Blvd.  
 Houston, TX  77030 
 Internet:"dhavilan at imm2.imm.uth.tmc.edu" 
 Voice: 713.500.2413  FAX: 713.500.2424
 ------------------------------------------------------  
Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.
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