This is my question

Mike Clark mrc7 at cam.ac.uk
Tue Jun 15 06:39:34 EST 1999


In article <376605EF.5632CE6D at pk-i.med.uni-muenchen.de>, Dr. Octavian Schatz
<URL:mailto:schatz at pk-i.med.uni-muenchen.de> wrote:
> historic: principle of vaccination (Dr. Jenner and the milkmaid ...)
> 
> modern: diversity of antibodies (cf. publications by Tonegawa et al.)
> 
> but this is a personal rating :-)
> 
> Hiroki Negishi schrieb:
> 
> > How are you.
> > Hiroki Negishi
> > I am student of immunology.
> > 9jmrm at is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp
> > Please my question.
> > What do you think most great invention
> > in immunology.
> > Please tell me your thinking.
> >
> > Hiroki Negihshi
> > immunology
> > 9jmrm007 at is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp
> 

If you really mean 'invention' rather than 'discovery' I would argue that
the invention of the technique for producing monoclonal antibodies together
with the invention of the 'fluorescent activated cell sorter (/analyser)'
would count as two of the most significant for immunology.

As for discovery I guess the basic observations of self non-self
discrimination (both innate and adaptive) as well as observations on
generation of diversity of T and B cell receptors rate highly.

I guess if my own immune system were voting it would be for every
immunological trick which kept my ancestors alive long enough to
reproduce so that I could be writing this in a newsgroup!

Cheers,

Mike Clark,                        <URL:http://www.path.cam.ac.uk/~mrc7/>
-- 
 o/ \\    //            ||  ,_ o   M.R. Clark, PhD. Division of Immunology
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