Histone Antibodies

Tom Thatcher ttha at mail1.ats.rochester.edu
Mon Jul 31 09:40:41 EST 2000


In article <39825A77.6834822E at wesleyan.edu>,
Daniel Ballon  <dballon at wesleyan.edu> wrote:
>Can anyone recommend a good polyclonal which recognizes all core nuclear
>histones, and has been tested in immunofluorescence?  In a perfect
>world, the immunogen would be from Tetrahymena thermophila, but human
>should be close enough.  We have tried anti-H3 from Upstate Biochemicals
>with no success, and would like a more broad-range option. Thank you,
>Daniel Ballon
>Wesleyan University
>

Does "all core histones" mean H3 from many species, or H2A, H2B, H3 and H4?
The sequences of the histones are so different I doubt very strongly that
any antibody could ever be developed that recognized all the core histones,
unless it was a preparation made by combining several different antibodies.
Histone antibodies are difficult to make in any case because they
are so highly conserved that you run into problems with tolerance.

-- 
Tom Thatcher                          
University of Rochester Cancer Center 
ttha at mail.rochester.edu           






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