two postdoctoral positions at Cornell

Dave Matthews matthews at greengenes.cit.cornell.edu
Thu Oct 2 11:48:54 EST 1997


Postdoctoral Position in Plant Molecular Biology

To identify, clone and characterize the genes controlling the size and
shape of fruit in plants.

The production of large, edible fruit by plants is a relatively recent
development in evolution. The wild relatives of crop plants produce only
very small berries, often less than 10% the size of that produced by their
cultivated counterparts.  We are engaged in a study to identify and clones
the set of genes responsible for producing the wide range of sizes and
shapes in edible fruit in domesticated plants using tomato as a model
system.  The approach involves QTL (quantitative trait loci) mapping
followed by position cloning (TAG 91:994; PNAS 93:15503) and gene
expression studies (transgenic and in situ). The function of these genes
will be also be evaluated in other plant species through a transgenic
approach (PNAS 93:9979). Individuals working on this project will have the
opportunity to help build the foundation of a new area of plant molecular
biology (fruit development) which may lead to new models for molecular
control of 3-dimensional growth in plants and strategies for genetic
engineering of plants to produce fruit of novel forms and biochemical
contents.  They will also be participating in one of the first QTL cloning
projects in plants.

Candidates should have a strong background in molecular biology, including
gene expression studies.  Experience in genetic research is desirable, but
not required.  Send curriculum vitae (including names of at least 3
references) to Steve Tanksley, Department of Plant Breeding, 252 Emerson
Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.  E.mail inquiries can be sent
to SDT4 at cornell.edu.



Postdoctoral Position in Molecular Breeding

To develop and test strategies for molecular breeding in crop plants using
exotic germplasm.

While much wild and exotic germplasm has been collected and preserved in
seed banks, very little of this germplasm has actually been used to enhance
cultivated crops.  As a result, many of the world's crop species have a
relatively narrow genetic base.  We have been exploring the use of genetic
mapping methods to extract useful alleles from wild germplasm for the
enhancement of crop plants (Science 277:1063).  A postdoctoral opening
exists for a person to join this project.  Research would involve
developing and testing molecular methods for gene introgression and
germplasm enhancement using tomato as a model system.

Candidates should have a strong background in genetics and statistics as
well as basic laboratory methods involved in molecular marker analysis.
Familiarity with other molecular biological techniques (e.g. bacterial
artificial chromosomes and cDNA screening) desirable, but not required.
Send curriculum vitae (including names of at least 3 references) to Steve
Tanksley, Department of Plant Breeding, 252 Emerson Hall, Cornell
University, Ithaca, NY 14853.  E.mail inquiries can be sent to
SDT4 at cornell.edu.








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