GLASS_BEAD_PURIFICATION_DNA

levyd at mcclb0.med.nyu.edu levyd at mcclb0.med.nyu.edu
Thu Feb 21 09:44:14 EST 1991


In article <009447D1.0CC2B140 at wystan.bsd.uchicago.edu>, loren at wystan.bsd.uchicago.edu writes:
> Can anyone recommend a source of glass beads suitable for use in DNA 
> purification?  I cannot locate the source cited in the article by B. 
> Vogelstein.  A specific catalogue number would help if there are dozens of
> related choices.  The Bio 101 GeneClean kits work so nicely, I can no
> longer afford the habit.  If anyone has any experience using DEAE cellulose
> paper, I would appreciate their comments. Schleicher and Schuell smallest
> unit sale is enough to last several years, but they only guarantee a one year 
> shelf life.   
>                            Thank You,
> 
> Loren Joseph
> Dept. of Pathology
> University of Chicago
> e-mail: ah,err, not quite sure but it is something like
>    the University Computer is designated @midway.uchicago.edu and I log on as 
> 'ljlj' but I connect to a miniVax at node wystan.bsd.uchicago.edu where I
> sign on as LOREN.  The minivax is also designated, at some level, as 
> @uchimvs1.  From the miniVax I go back to the university newserver. 

S&S NA45 paper works very well and the 1 yr shelf life guarantee is probably
very conservative.  We have successfully used material 2-3 yrs old, but there
is a deterioration if it gets too old or if it is stored in a hot place where
it gets too dried out.
Glass powder can usually be found at art or ceramics supply stores.  Ask for
the finest glass milk.  It is often used to mix with paint to make a
light-reflective paint.



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