minigels on slides keep floating away - help

Vivian Miao VMiao at oregon.uoregon.edu
Thu Aug 26 11:05:47 EST 1993


In article <1993Aug25.111545.9978 at gserv1.dl.ac.uk>, daj at uk.ac.ic.nhm
((David Johnston) daj) wrote:
> 
> On 24 Aug 1993 21:19:59 GMT,
>   Gregory Stuart writes:
> 
> >Shiver me timbers! I have been making little mini-gels on frosted
> >microscope slides, by mixing molten 1% LMP agarose with lymphocytes, and
> >pipeting this onto the slides, and overlaying the agarose with a
> >coverslip. Later, I remove the coverslip (carefully sliding it off the
> >agarose) and place the slide in an alkaline lysis buffer. However, many
> >times my gels will separate from the slides. Any sugesstions? Thanks, Greg.

 
So David Johnston says ....

> Idea 2 (expensive but if it doesn't work at least you can complain!)
> LKB-Pharmacia sell a version of their "GEL-BOND" for agarose work. This is 
> a sheet of stiff plastic approx 0.5mm thick (cuttable with 
> scalpel or scissors) which has been pretreated on one side to bind agarose. 
> I have used it for rocket electrophoresis (hands up all those who 
> remember that old technique) with 200x100 gels with no problems.

OK, I'll ask ....

What's rocket electrophoresis?


(And for Gregory Stuart - here's a page from my ancient lab-lore/home
remedy
  book that may apply to your mini-gel floaters ...

I used to pour thin gels on small pieces of plain/frosted glass.  It helped
 to set the glass plate on a fancy"stand" of some sort (e.g. bottle cap, 
post-it pad, eraser
 what ever was handy) so that the edges were not in contact with a surface.
  The agarose was pipetted onto the surface,  and the gel held its shape by
 surface tension.  Having the glass on a "stand" meant that the gels also
held
 onto the * edges* of the glass from the sides, because the gels always
bulged
outward.  Gels never "lost their grip" on the glass when they were poured
this way. 

Good Luck!  

:-)     



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