sickness due to genetech ?

Jerry N. Alexandratos alexandr at ncifcrf.gov
Wed Jun 16 10:35:55 EST 1993


In article <1vko9hINNron at s-crim1.dl.ac.uk> mbrgw at s-crim1.dl.ac.uk (R.G. Walters) writes:
>In article <1993Jun15.144405.21176 at gserv1.dl.ac.uk> suter at VAX.MPIZ-KOELN.mpg.d400.de writes:
>>Robin walters wrote (as part of the discussion on EtBr waste) on 
>>material-and-methods:
>>+ Rather like the cloning of an active oncogene into SV40 in an uncontrolled
>>+ environment. This happened at the Pasteur Institute, I believe, and several
>>+ workers and several members of the public "caught" cancer. I don't know if
>>+ any of them died.  
>Just to elaborate (before the lawsuits start flying ;-), I don't recall ever
>seeing any documentation of this, but it was a _VERY_ strong rumour a while
>back - it may be apocryphal, but it's the sort of thing I am quite prepared
>to believe, given the current discussion on lab non-safety.
>Robin Walters.                      Robert Hill Institute, Sheffield UK.

Hello, folks.  Why has no one responded?  I do not believe it is possible to
show that someone can "catch" cancer.  It would take not only the organism with
the oncogene to be viable away from it's growth medium, but in a totally 
foreign organism, e.g. humans, long enough to pass along genetic material.
The genetic material would have to be transferred in such a way as to be still
intact.  Given that we have lots of living bacteria and virii in our systems 
and we don't transfer DNA with *them*, I don't see that this is possible, never
mind likely.  In summary, IMNSHO, I don't believe it at all.  Please show me
some proof, first...  then I will take this up again.  

Jerry.  

p.s. if the sig file doesn't work- I am not representing them in any way
in this post, but I work for the U.S. National Cancer Institute in a research
laboratory.



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