Patents, Copyrights, and License Agreements

Bob DeLisio delisior at rnisd0.DNET.roche.com
Mon Nov 8 13:45:00 EST 1993


Many have lost sight of the point of this discussion, therefore I feel it is 
necessary at this time to repost the original message and its follow-up that 
originally drew my attention to this matter and started this debate for me. 
You, the reader, can be your own judge and make up your own mind as to whether 
you think what Jim Graham is disclosing in these postings illegal or unethical 
conduct. 

As I have stated previously I truly believe that it is repugnant that this kind
of activity is going on. Not only in my mind is it unethical and illegal, it is
childish for anyone to believe that this behavior occurs in a vacuum. Such 
things have a huge impact on everything we do from the way we conduct our 
research to the laws we pass to protect our ideas and creations to the creation
and loss of jobs in the research community. It only makes me angrier to see 
that this attitude is being condoned and encouraged by a few irresponsible
egomaniacs in this newsgroup, but so be it.

As this is my last contribution to this debate, I would just like to add one 
other thing. It has been suggested that I have behaved as some sort of 
"net.cop" in way that I don't know. Let me assure you, however, that I am 
nothing of the kind. I have never intended to pursue any avenue of recourse 
other than discussing my own opinions and feelings on this issue with other 
subscribers to this newsgroup. And I certainly never threatened to "sue" 
anybody. I am neither in the position nor do I have the power or inclination to
take such a course of action. 


Bob
Bob DeLisio
=====================================================
 _/   _/     Robert DeLisio
  _/ _/      Roche Institute of Molecular Biology
    _/       Roche Research Center
   _/ _/     Nutley, New Jersey 07110-1199
  _/   _/
   _/ _/     Voice: (201) 235-3728
     _/      Fax:   (201) 235-2318
    _/ _/    Internet: delisior at rnisd0.dnet.roche.com
   _/   _/   CompuServe: 73517,2616
=====================================================



-------------------------------< start of repost>-------------------------------

Path: bio.indiana.edu!usenet.ucs.indiana.edu!bronze.ucs.indiana.edu!jgraham
From: jgraham at bronze.ucs.indiana.edu (the End)
Subject: Re: Amersham takes over USB - Canadian price for Sequenase soars
Message-ID: <CAuopw.6JD at usenet.ucs.indiana.edu>
Sender: news at usenet.ucs.indiana.edu (USENET News System)
Nntp-Posting-Host: bronze.ucs.indiana.edu
Organization: Indiana University
References: <9307271417.AA09398 at resunix.ri.sickkids.on.ca>
Distribution: bionet
Date: Wed, 28 Jul 1993 01:13:04 GMT

Indeed, we have a thermophile here that produced a nice batch of Taq
and released it to the department saving us all about half the
cost and paying off his own efforts. This single large scale prep has held
out for about a year and I would imagine it will last a while longer.

Its about time we see scientists take matters back into their own hands.

Its refreshing to see this newsgroup play an important role, rather
than merely being a forum for young researchers to debate the merits
of the different commercial kits which are quickly taking the place
of the standard (but less commerically profitable) techniques that have built this science.

Hats off to you,

Jim
J. Graham
Biology and Chemistry Departments
Indiana University Bloomington





Path: bio.indiana.edu!usenet.ucs.indiana.edu!bronze.ucs.indiana.edu!jgraham
From: jgraham at bronze.ucs.indiana.edu (the End)
Subject: Re: Amersham takes over USB - Canadian price for Sequenase soars
Message-ID: <CB8quH.Kw6 at usenet.ucs.indiana.edu>
Sender: news at usenet.ucs.indiana.edu (USENET News System)
Nntp-Posting-Host: bronze.ucs.indiana.edu
Organization: Indiana University
References: <9307271417.AA09398 at resunix.ri.sickkids.on.ca>
<1993Jul30.144058.8473 at alw.nih.gov>
Date: Wed, 4 Aug 1993 15:25:29 GMT

Oh, I must have forgotten to mention, of course we don't use our Taq
polymerase for PCR. We use it in storage buffers as a stabilizer, much
like BSA :)

As pointed out, anyone can purify any enzyme they damn well please, as
long as patented recombinant organisms are not involved.

The idea of cycling the temperature of an enzymatic reaction was proposed
long ago in standard scientific publication, and the application of
the various thermostable polymerases to this procedure may well have
occured in the absence of any patented process per se.
More?

I can assure you that the proper legal aspects have been considered.

Thanks much,

Jim
J. Graham




More information about the Methods mailing list