runoff/run-on

Leonard Bloksberg preissj at clvax1.msu.edu
Wed Sep 8 16:40:00 EST 1993


In Article <2154 at alsys1.aecom.yu.edu> "ksk at ksksun.bioc.aecom.yu.edu (Ken Krauter)" says:
> 
> In article AA01446 at biology.UCSC.EDU, niflab at biology.ucsc.edu (Ludwig Lab-UCSC) writes:
> 
> >>does anybody know what is the difference between run-on and run-off
> >>transcription assays ?
> >>Thank you in advance for your answers,
> >>
> >>Paula Mulo
> >>University of Turku
> >>SF-20500 TURKU
> >>Finland
> >
> >The difference between "run-on" and "run-off" appears to
> >the the Atlantic Ocean.  Europeans tend to consider the 
> >reaction to run on (or along) the template, whereas Americans
> >( at least one, once) tend to consider that it runs off the end.
> >..
> > 
> >      ------------------------------------------------
> >	Robert Kuhn, PhD
> >	Sinsheimer Laboratories
> >	University of California
> >	Santa Cruz, CA 95064  USA
> >   
> 
> There is a scientific difference which is not semantic!!  Run-on transcription refers to in vitro nuclear
> transcription analysis where preinitiated complexes in intact nuclei are permitted to elongate the
> nascent RNA transcript 200-400 bases after addition of XTPs.  Run-off transcription refers to 
> in vitro transcription where a naked, linearized DNA template is mixed with polymerase and other
> goodies and it initiates, elongates then falls off the end of the linear template.  Hence run-OFF.
> 
> I teach this in Gene Expression for beginners and every year I fine students 2 points for making this
> sloppy mistake.
> 
> 
> 
> Ken Krauter
> Department of Cell Biology
> Albert Einstein College of Medicine
> 1300 Morris Park Ave.
> Bronx, NY  10461
> Tel.  (718) 430-3509
> FAX.  (718) 829-7619
> Email ksk at ksksun.ca.aecom.yu.edu
> 
> 
Thanks Ken, that's the way I learned it from Ray Rodriques (the R of pBR)
at UC Davis when I was a grad student.
		Dr. Leonard N. Bloksberg



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