Bacterial Genetics

Michael John Fath mjfath at ellis.uchicago.edu
Wed Jan 12 09:27:08 EST 1994


In article <2grgd4$i0o at salmon.maths.tcd.ie> bermand at maths.tcd.ie (daniel berman) writes:
>I am a Senior Freshman Genetics/Biochemistry student in Trinity
>College Dublin, and I am answering a paper on "Gene structure and
>expression in bacteria and their phages"
>
>I am looking for advice on what people think is the "cutting edge"
>in this field  (A very large one, I know).  So if you have any
>advice, could you mail it to me.Anything would be of help.
>
>Thanks,
>Dan

I'm not sure what you mean, but I think you mean, "What is the cutting edge
of genetics research in bacteria? or What is the most broadly significant 
research in prokaryotic genetics these days?"  
If so, here are a few suggestions:

1. protein folding - Jon Beckwith's lab, Jonathan King's lab and others, 
are using E. coli and their phage to study fundemental questions of protein
folding.

2. stationary phase gene expresion - the hottest thing in bacterial genetics
is the study of the post exponential phase of bacterial growth.  see work
of Roberto Kolter, Regina Henge-Aronis, and others

3. bacteria as simple developmental systems.  Prokaryotes still have an 
incredible amount to teach us about developmental biology.  Hot topics
include  sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, hyphae formation in Myxococcus
xanthus, stalk formation in Caulobaer cresentus, heterocyst formation
in Anabaena.

Hope this helps.

Michael

-- 
MM   MM FFFFF 	Michael J. Fath		
M M M M F	Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology
M  M  M FFF     The University of Chicago
M     M F       Chicago, IL  60637                mjfath at midway.uchicago.edu



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