crucifixion

Michael J Marino mjmst33+ at pitt.edu
Sun Mar 6 16:19:09 EST 1994


In article <hxm8.21.00008519 at po.cwru.edu> hxm8 at po.cwru.edu (Harry Menegay) writes:
>In article <2lbo07$aej at usenet.INS.CWRU.Edu> dd034 at cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Seth Daniel Crosby) writes:
>>From: dd034 at cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Seth Daniel Crosby)
>>Subject: crucifixion
>>Date: 6 Mar 1994 04:59:50 GMT
>
>
>>"This friend" of mine wants to know if she can be nailed for
>>discussing enzymes in this forum that she uses for PCR 
>>which are not licensed for that purpose.
>
>
>YES!!!  His name is Bob.  Bob is annoying.  Bob will throw a fit if he see's 
>any reference to non-licensed PCR.  Bob will threaten "your friend" with 
>mighty lawyers that his company keeps on retainer ready to sue anyone 
>who uses a microliter or two of "unlicensed" PCR enzyme.
>
>Bob is a waste of bandwidth.  :-}



I am curious to know the exact nature of the patent they hold.  I assume
it is on the process of PCR rather than simply on the name or on the
enzyme.  Have they ever actually taken this issue to court?  It really
seems inane that rapid changes in temperature could be patented.

If I for some reason believed that, for example, the proofreading ability
of some other polymerase was essential for my experiment could I then just
call the thing "Proofreading PCR" and be safe?  

The funny part of it all is that if the prices were comparable no one
would likely care.  I assume they maintain high prices in order to pay the
legal staff.

Disclaimer: I don't work for anyone that cares one way or the other.

Michael.

-- 
---
Michael J. Marino                            email MJMST33+ at pitt.edu
Department of Behavioral Neuroscience        Phone  412-624-4393
University of Pittsburgh,PGH, PA 15260       Fax 412-624-9198



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