isoamyl alcohol

Mic Chaudoir mic at nwu.edu
Mon Feb 20 18:03:33 EST 1995


In article <3hol30$gla at news.ycc.yale.edu>, burbly at minerva.cis.yale.edu
(Marc A. Borbely) wrote:

> i have looked everywhere but can't find an answer:
> why in the world is isoamyl alcohol used together with phenol and 
> chloroform for extraction of nucleic acids?
> I've asked this on sci.bio and the only response i've gotten so far was 
> that it keeps down foaming. Other people have suggested that it serves to 
> "catch"  proteins that are too hydrophilic for the organic compounds and 
> too hydrophobic for the aqueous layer.

We generally include it in ChCl3 used after phenol extractions of nucleic
acid solutions, ata level of 4%.  It is also known as "Iso-Pentyl" alcohol
(atleast that's what we use..... ).  Anyway, I think that the purpose is
simply to "sharpen" the chcl3/water interface so that you can more easily
seperate your sample from any remaining chcl3/phenol.  It certainly
doesn't seem to hurt anything.

-- 
mic
mic at nwu.edu
 
"It [PowerPC Mac] won't have any effect at all on Intel machines.
They will continue to plod along, running the same clunky Windows              and wretched DOS drivel they always have.  The PPC will affect Intel PCs the same way an SR-71 Blackbird affects a dairy cow."
                     Robert Rhode, in comp.sys.mac.advocacy



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