Tom Thatcher ttha at
Mon Nov 13 10:38:18 EST 1995

In <487gr1$bk1 at> "Matthias Vogel" <Matthias.Vogel at> writes:

>> Subject: Virus on Internet (fwd)
>> Just got this message from a friend.
>> >>>If you receive an e-mail message with the subject line "GOOD TIMES", DO NOT 
>> >>>read the message, DELETE it immediately. Please read the messages below.

[Goodtimes hoax deleted]

>Matthias Vogel
>Institut fuer medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene
>Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg
>Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11
>D-93053 Regensburg
>Tel. 0941/944-6483
>Fax 0941/944-6402
>E-Mail: Matthias.Vogel at

This is a very old hoax.  Please do not repeat it.  Please tell the 
"friend" who sent the warning to you that it is a hoax, and ask him/her
to stop spreading it around as well.  The following document has
information about this hoax and internet addresses of more complete
information.  Please save this for the future.

begin included file

               The Good Times email virus is a hoax! 
       If anyone repeats the hoax, please show them the FAQ. 

              G o o d  T i m e s  V i r u s  H o a x 
                          M i n i  FAQ 

                          by Les Jones 
                         macfaq at
                       lesjones at

                         April 27, 1995

This information can be freely reproduced in any medium, as long as
the information is unmodified.

A FAQ, if you're new to the Internet, is a document that answers
Frequently Asked Questions. his Mini FAQ is a summary of, and a a
reference to, the full FAQ, which has much more information about
this and other hoaxes. Instructions for retrieving the full FAQ are
at the end of this message. The Mini FAQ is short enough for faxes,
message boards, mailing lists, and people with short attention

Is the Good Times email virus a hoax?

Yes. It's a hoax.

America Online, government computer security agencies, and makers
of anti-virus software have declared Good Times a hoax. See Online
References at the end of the FAQ.

The hoax has been around since at least November of 1994. Since
that time, no copy of the alleged virus has ever been found, nor
has there been a single verified case of a viral attack.

I'm new to the Internet. What is the Good Times virus hoax?

The story is that a virus called Good Times is being carried by
email. Just reading a message with "Good Times" in the subject line
will erase your hard drive, or even destroy your computer's
processor. Needless to say, it's a hoax, but a lot of people
believed it.

Some of the companies that have reportedly fallen for the hoax
include AT&T, CitiBank, NBC, Hughes Aircraft, Texas Instruments,
and dozens or hundreds of others. There have been outbreaks at
numerous colleges.

The U.S. government has not been immune. Some of the government
agencies that have reportedly fallen victim to the hoax include the
Department of Defense, the FCC, and NASA. 

The full Good Times Virus Hoax FAQ has more information about the
origins of the hoax, and variations on the text of the hoax.

What was the CIAC bulletin? 

On December 6, 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy's CIAC (Computer
Incident Advisory Capability) issued a bulletin declaring the Good
Times virus a hoax and an urban legend. The bulletin was widely
quoted as an antidote to the hoax. The original document can be
found at the address in Online References at the end of the mini
FAQ, and is included verbatim in the full FAQ. CIAC issued another
bulletin on April 24, 1995 to reiterate that Good Times is a hoax.

Online References

CIAC Notes 94-05 95-09, and especially 94-04
FTP to and look in the pub/ciac/notes directory. The
URL is

The URL for the CIAC home page on the World Wide Web is:

America Online's official statement
keyword "virus2" on America Online

Where can I find the complete Good Times Virus Hoax FAQ?
Via FTP:
FTP to and look in the pub/lesjones directory. The URL is

On the World Wide Web: -- good
hypertext  -- great hypertext -- lots of virus info
(Note: the V must be capitalized.)

On Usenet:

On America Online:
the file libraries at keyword "virus"

end included message
Tom Thatcher                          | You can give a PC to a Homo habilis,
University of Rochester Cancer Center | and he'll use it, but he'll use it
ttha at           | to crack nuts.

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