Ion-free water for human consumption?

Milvern K Miller s975139 at umslvma.umsl.edu
Sat Oct 12 19:04:56 EST 1996


H.C. Benson wrote:
> 
> In article <536295$o0g at news1.dra.com>, miller at diamond.jcn1.com says...
> >
> >krasel at wpxx02.toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de (Cornelius Krasel) writes: > z
> (un691cs at genius.embnet.dkfz-heidelberg.de) wrote:
> >> > So my question is: is it healthy or not to drink distilled or VE
> water.
> >> > are there any studies that describe damage to the organism ?
> >>
> >> AFAIK it's an urban legend. BTW, VE water is usually prepared by two
> >> consecutive ion exchanger steps.
> >>
> >> Thread renamed. Followups narrowed.
> >>
> >> --Cornelius.
> >>
> >> --
> >> /* Cornelius Krasel, U Wuerzburg, Dept. of Pharmacology, Versbacher
> Str. 9 */
> >> /* D-97078 Wuerzburg, Germany   email: phak004 at rzbox.uni-wuerzburg.de
> SP3 */
> >> /* "Science is the game we play with God to find out what His rules
> are."  */
> >
> >DeIonized water contains no Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, or any other ions
> >good, or bad, in it.  When you drink the water it is devoid of salt.
> >Electrolyte balance, however, is maintained by the kidneys.  I have
> >consumed DI water from some faucets in some chemistry labs and prefer
> >its taste (or lack of it) to other waters.  I am not sure if it would be
> >better for someone on a low sodium diet than hard water.  Flouridation,
> >which occurs in some places, might reduce cavities, however, I don't
> >know what other effects it might have.  As to studies I don't know... .
> 
> Hello Cornelius,
> My interest is in deuterium oxide which contaminates all terrestrial
> water supplies at a ratio ranging from 1:5000 to 1:7000.  It is a puzzle
> to me why so little research has been done on the deleterious effects of
> exposure to these concentrations over the human lifespan.
> H. C. Benson                    cbenson at cswnet.com
> EUREKA! Idea Development        http://www.ntid.com/eureka

It is somewhat interesting that my statement about drinking deionized
water has generated such a response.  With regard to D20, I think I
rember reading once in Encyclopedia Brittanica (my old 1971 edition)
that D20 will have the interesting effect of slowing reactions down
within a cell when there is a large amount of D20 present (on the order
of 5% or more).  I heard that the reason this is so is that although
Deuturium is electronically identical to Hydrogen, its extra weight will
cause reactants to move more slowly as each reaction occurs, either
because of hindrance of other molecules, or because of its being
incorporated into the organic molecules of the cell and slowing those
molecules down by increased weight.  I may be mistaken but I think that
is what I heard.



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