quick question

Bernard Murray bernard at elsie.nci.nih.gov
Mon Feb 24 00:25:19 EST 1997


In article <tyr-2-2202971729040001 at news.srv.ualberta.ca>, 
tyr-2 at bones.biochem.ualberta.ca says...
>
>In article <geha-2202971604390001 at 128.125.35.207>, geha at hsc.usc.edu (Rani
>Geha) wrote:
>> What is the difference between transfection and transformation?
>
>Roughly speaking it is the host
>Transfection = eukaryotic host
>Transformation = prokaryotic host
>...and as to yeast I've seen both terms used.
>Cheers
>Karl the hepB guy
>-- 
>Karl Fischer
>tyr-2 at bones.biochem.ualberta.ca

Wow, it seems as though everyone has their own idea.  Just to give
another interpretation;

Transformation: Stable transfer of DNA to host
(so plasmid into bacteria, episomal or integrated plasmid in
eukaryotic cells)

Transfection: Transient transfer of DNA to host
(plasmid into mammalian cells that is expressed but not selected)

The key thing is that transformed DNA is replicated and *inherited*
during cell division (rather than just segregated).

I fully admit that this is just the definition I had picked up
locally.  If the concensus is that this is wrong I'm prepared to
give in (ie. transform my opinion).
	Now if you want to get a real argument going around here
try "the difference between run-on and run-off transcription...".

	Bernard

Bernard Murray, Ph.D.
bernard at elsie.nci.nih.gov (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA)




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