Looking for cDNA sequence or accession number of IRS-2 - whole text

Peter Pichler peter.pichler at akh-wien.ac.at
Wed Feb 26 08:35:54 EST 1997


Hi, Wolfi:

One reason why you cannot find the sequence might be that it is NOT stored in the database under the definition name "insulin receptor substrate 2" that you have looked for but under another name, e.g. "sequence similar to isr-1" or "sequence found by screening with moAb to isr-1".
If you do not have the original paper of the publication with the accession number at hand, you could try to search e.g. at EMBNETs WWW-search site.
Here in Vienna, I use the search engine of the local EMBnet node that can be reached at "http://vienna.at.embnet.org/srs/srsc/": A nice site pops up. Klick at "search sequence libraries". Then select that you want to search "EMBL" as well as "GENBANK" and "EMNEW". In the fields below, chose "definition" instead of "all text" in the first three lines, and enter "insulin" in the first line, "receptor" in the second line, and "substrate" in the third line.
In the last line, change "all text" into "organism", and enter "human". The queries are automatically combined with "AND" (preset, is OK). In the field below, select that you want to be shown everything from "ID" to "links" (or as you like it). Then klick at "DO QUERY".
One important fact to remember is that GENBANK and EMBL databases are ALMOST identical, though not to 100%. Because of this, EMBnet provides only those sequences in the local GENBANK database mirror that are not already present in EMBL. (It would not make sense to store redundant information twice!) In other words, if you search in Genbank only, you practically do a search "genbank NOT embl"!!!
Therefore, always chose genbank as well as "embl" when searching at an EMBnet node!

When I did the search mentioned above, 11 results came up. The ACs are:

D23673
L05198
S62539
S85963
T53178
T29863
AA039612
AA039621
AA069842
AA070751
AA070752

The results contain a few sequences that are described as "clone similar to insulin receptor substrate 1" etc.
Hopefully, you can find the one among it that you think is called now "isr-2".

Hope that helps

Peter


peter.pichler at vm.akh-wien.ac.at




More information about the Methods mailing list