Recommendations for cheaper "stratacooler" benchtop coolers?

Dima Klenchin klenchin at REMOVE_TO_REPLY.facstaff.wisc.edu
Mon Jun 21 20:34:54 EST 1999


In article <r_grant-2106990956260001 at 192.168.0.84>, rgrant at netscape.net wrote:
>In article <7ke24j$eau$1 at news.doit.wisc.edu>,
>klenchin at facstaff.REMOVE_TO_REPLY.wisc.edu (Dima Klenchin) wrote:
>
>>:In article <7kdn1p$16rc$7 at news.doit.wisc.edu>,
>>:klenchin at facstaff.REMOVE_TO_REPLY.wisc.edu (Dima Klenchin) wrote:
>>:
>>:>Every lab has heating aluminum block sitting somewhere unused.
>>:>Place it at -20C and that's it. Not as convenient to handle but
>>:>the result is the same.
>>:
>>:You've checked the warming curve of these blocks, then?  IAMFI.
>>:
>>
>>No, I did not. I just stuck termometer into it, and it kept below zero 
>>for one hour. Good enough for me. 
>
>Heh, well you can keep *your* enzymes in it if you like . . . . :)
>

I do. I find your response strange for a scientist, however :->

I am telling you result of an experiment. You dennounce the result and
it's implication based on your beliefs. Unless you have attempted to reproduce
the experiment and failed to obtain the same result, as a scientist, you 
should do one of the following instead: 

1. Trust the result, and take note of it. 
2. Point out that the conditions of the experiment were inappropriate
    (this would require elaborating, obviously). 
3. Point out that the conclusions drawn were inappropriate
    (this would require elaborating, too). 
4. Attempt to reproduce the experiment and report the results. 
    (In case you decide to do just that, please keep in mind that I omitted 
    what I considered totally obvious - don't let the block contact with 
    the bench; put on on some insulation surface such as styrofoam box).

        - Dima



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