Fw: The People's Seed Bank

Brian Sandle bsandle at caverock.net.nz
Tue Dec 26 20:11:13 EST 2000


On 26 Dec 2000, Deanne Bell wrote:

> I am interested in the subject and like to follow the saga "The People's
> Seed bank" - and - not meaning to offend Brian, but I too find your answers
> to be a bit *sarcastic and aggressive*.  

Are referring to the comment:
> > I suppose that isn't an excuse for delaying the inevitable out of the
> > knowledge of trouble?

I feel that the changes being made are far too rapid. We are not doing
enough to understand what nature is about befor making changes.

   J Cell Biol 2000 Apr 17;149(2):369-78
   
A small chloroplast-encoded protein as a novel architectural component of
the
light-harvesting antenna.
 
    Ruf S, Biehler K, Bock R
    
   Institut fur Biologie III, Universitat Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg,
   Germany.
   
   A small conserved open reading frame in the plastid genome, ycf9,
   encodes a putative membrane protein of 62 amino acids. To determine
   the function of this reading frame we have constructed a knockout
   allele for targeted disruption of ycf9. This allele was introduced
   into the tobacco plastid genome by biolistic transformation to replace
   the wild-type ycf9 allele. Homoplasmic ycf9 knockout plants displayed
   no phenotype under normal growth conditions. However, under low light
   conditions, their growth rate was significantly reduced as compared
   with the wild-type, due to a lowered efficiency of the light reaction
   of photosynthesis. We show that this phenotype is caused by the
   deficiency in a pigment-protein complex of the light-harvesting
   antenna of photosystem II and hence by a reduced efficiency of photon
   capture when light availability is limiting. Our results indicate
   that, in contrast to the current view, light-harvesting complexes do
   not only consist of the classical pigment-binding proteins, but may
   contain small structural subunits in addition. These subunits appear
   to be crucial architectural factors for the assembly and/or
   maintenance of stable light-harvesting complexes.
   
   PMID: 10769029, UI: 20231888

There must be much to discover about why nature has come to where it has.

Do you feel the balance between pure research as opposed to applied
research and applications is good enough at the moment in transgenics?

In New Zealand we have just had approved a field test of Buster or Escort
resistant pine trees. I do not see any reference to looking for effects of
those herbicides on algal photosynthesis. That is not to speak of the
problems from the GM technique itself.

The approach of applied science at the moment seems to be to deal with
problems as they arise if they have not been thought of with the
resources given. Let us watch out that the solutions are not generating
more problems than they are solving.

Dodo
 
> 
> ----------
> 
> > > "Brian Sandle" <bsandle at caverock.net.nz> wrote in message
> > > news:Pine.LNX.4.21.0012201431400.18054-100000 at shell.caverock.net.nz...
> > > : On Tue, 19 Dec 2000, David Kendra wrote:
> > > : But you are claiming 
> 
> (i)* that any and every tissue culture book deals also
> > > : with transgenics. * 
> 
> (ii) that though transgening produces a major change in
> > > : the protein structure of the plant it does not change the genetic
> > > : structure enough to have any effect on the somaclonal variation of
> the
> > > : tissue cultured plants. What percentage figure do you give for
> > > : signifcance?
> > > :
> > > : How about a book title & page reference. If any one has it in, you
> must
> > > : have one readily at hand.  And I am interested to see whether it
> tells
> > of
> > > : genes wedged into varying places in the chromosome, and any effects
> of
> > > : that.
> > > :
> > > : Dodo
> > > 
> > > Brian, Thanks for the nice ending to your comments.  You ask for
> specifics
> > > which I was about to cite but after reading your slam at the end you
> are on
> > > your own.
> > 
> > No, this is supposed to be a bit educational. Maybe you would like a less
> > emotive word than `wedged'?
> > 
> > In the biolistic process DNA (genes) is introduced to plant cells via
> > micro-projectiles. Genes can enter the chromosomes at many different
> > `sites' and only some of the resulting plants will survive. Many of the
> > survivors will be somewhat impaired - less photosynthesis might be traded
> > for more Bt or RR in the choice of which to keep.
> > 
> > The plants which survive are field tested and also examined as to which
> > site in which chromosome the genes have `lodged.' Then the products from
> > those are tested for some generations. 
> > 
> > So I was referring to that process when I wrote:
> > 
> >  And I am interested to see whether it tells
> > of
> > > : genes wedged into varying places in the chromosome, and any effects
> of
> > > : that.
> > 
> > But I should have added the effects under varying conditions of stress,
> > heat cycling, drought, fungal, viral and animal pests, varying light
> > conditions.
> > 
> > It is claimed that a plant is breeding true after 10 generations when
> what
> > percentage of the progeny have their phenotypes and genes cheacked?
> > 
> > Then back-crossing needs to be checked, too. Is there a program keeping a
> > constant watch on the structures of the transgenic weed rape in Canada?
> > 
> >  
> >   It is clear that you lack all common respect for anyone who
> > > disagrees with you.  I wrote the one line reply during my lunch break
> while
> > > scanning the newsgroups.
> > 
> > Thankyou for taking part.
> > 
> > > Sorry that you cant do you own homework.
> > 
> > I suppose that isn't an excuse for delaying the inevitable out of the
> > knowledge of trouble?
> > 
> > Dodo
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> ---
> 



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