heat-resitant proteases?

kresten no-sp at m.org
Tue Aug 14 01:39:28 EST 2001


You can see my FEBS paper:
Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards
denaturant, heat and proteases.
FEBS Lett. 488(3):145-8, 2001
for experimental details.

Also, I now remember that VG Eijsink has studied thermolysin-like proteases
and their heat-stability. I heard him give a talk where he convincingly
demonstrated that you can make a protease highly temperature stable (meaning
not loosing their activity) by removing their tendency to autoinactivate. In
fact they engineered a protease to resist boling (for some time at least).
Further, this engineered protease had WT-like activity at 37 degreesC in
contrast to many proteases from thermophilics. All this is described in
their 1998 PNAS paper.

good luck,
Kresten

"James Park" <jpark100 at hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:9l8sbm$bfj$1 at news.rt66.com...
> Dear Kresten,
>
> I thought about subtilisin which is included in some laundry detergents.
> I have no idea how stabile subtilisin is at 70C.
> Could you please describe the buffer which you used for thermolysin?
> I might try thermolysion.
>
> Thanks.
>
> james
>
>
>
> "kresten" <no-sp at m.org> wrote in message
> news:9l7ttl$jn2$1 at news.net.uni-c.dk...
> > I have used thermolysin with success at 70 degrees. Among the several
> > controls I had, one included adding a (partially) unfolded protein after
> > incubating thermolysin for 30 min. The enzyme was still active.
> >
> > There are many references on the use of thermolysin.
> >
> > HTH
> > Kresten
> >
> >
> > "James Park" <jpark100 at hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:9l3dh9$l1o$1 at news.rt66.com...
> > > I am wondering if there are proteases or proteinases which can survive
> at
> > > higher temperature (80oC).
> > > The purpose is to digest tough proteins/glycoproteins at 80oC or 900C.
> > > James.
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>





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