IMPORTANT - high school needs equipment

clarosa clarosa at biocomp.unl.edu
Mon Feb 5 18:22:55 EST 2001


This situation illustrates the disconnect between rhetoric and budgetary
reality.
The wealthy have done well in the last expansion. But not the homeowner who
pays for schools.
Part of the solution would be a national tax increase on the wealthy who are
reaping the benefits of the globalization of the economy.  Since local tax
payers are not benefiting much by the new economy, only a rather national
socialistic trend in politics will correct the disparity.   The new economy
is a licence for the new wealthy class to separate themselves from the
public economy.  Socialism has been a dirty word for decades,
but only more socialistic trends can correct the ability of the wealthy to
remove themselves from the public economy.

David Kristofferson wrote:I am staggered by the fact that school systems,
despite all of the

> political and media attention given lately to education, are still
> struggling with budgetary problems in the midst of one of the greatest
> economic booms in history.  Our local high school district just passed a
> large school bond measure with the onerously required 2/3's majority
> **after three attempts** but all of this money is targeted for building
> repairs (there are some very old facilities in the district that have
> been nursed along for years with minimal upkeep).  I'm also serving on a
> citizen oversight committee on the disbursement of funds from this
> initiative.  The deferred maintenance issues and, of course, the long
> running battles over paying teachers decent wages mean that other areas
> of budgetary need continue to go wanting.
>






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