Ames test: Ethidium bromide: azide

Michael Witty mw132 at mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
Thu Jul 19 06:38:29 EST 2001


Thanks Nick, this is exactly the kind of thing we should get from the
safety officer, so that we can use these compounds safely.  Rather than
dopy comments like 1ml of 0.02% sodium azide is an explosive hazard.
Mike.

On Wed, 18 Jul 2001, Nick Theodorakis wrote:

> In
> <Pine.SGI.4.33.0107182118570.2615940-100000 at mole.bio.cam.ac.uk>,
> Michael Witty wrote:
> >
> >On Wed, 18 Jul 2001, Warren Gallin wrote:
> >> So if you are flushing azide down a sink with metal plumbing, over a
> >> period of time a nasty explosive will build up in the traps.  The poor
> >> plumber who cracks one of them can have a small grenade going off
> in
> >> his/her face.  This has actually happened, so not a theoretical
> >> consideration at all.
> >
> >Dear Warren,
> >            please let me know about the paper or news report that has
> >described these two kinds of accident.  I really am interested in
> >collecting examples of this kind of thing happening.
> >Mike.
> >
>
> This is the closest thing I could find:
>
> http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/78127_13.html
>
> I also found reports of lab accidents with azides, eg. see:
>
> http://pubs.acs.org/cen/safety/
>
> and a report of a large drum of azide waste exploding:
>
> http://enquirer.com/editions/1999/10/01/loc_maker_pleads_guilty.html
> (N.B.: that's the Cincinnati Enquirer, not the National Enquirer)
>
> These incidents seem to happen with relatively large amounts of azide in
> use.
>
> Note also, however, that even sodium azide is explosive when heated or
> concussed;  it's used to inflae air bags, e.g.
>
> Nick
>
> PS: air drain pipes still made from lead or copper?
>
> --
> Nick Theodorakis
> nicholas_theodorakis at urmc.rochester.edu
>
>
>




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